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Search the products with '^wall$', '\swall\s', '^wall ' or ' wall$' in its name. But it should not have results like 'wallpaper' or 'wonderwall'

SELECT * 
FROM `products` 
WHERE (products.name REGEXP 'wall?[:space]')  
ORDER BY products.updated_at DESC

So far the above obviously doesn't work. What should be the correct way to do this.

Updated the spec for clearer explanation.

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Your spec is inconsistent. E.g. wallpaper matches products with "wall". Please can you be clearer about what you are trying to achieve? Are you attempting to match Any string where "wall" appears as a single word? –  RB. Apr 2 '12 at 11:55
    
That's the problem that I am having. "wallpaper" should not be matched. It should be either nothing at the end or in front or just space in front or at the end. –  Thorpe Obazee Apr 2 '12 at 11:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
SELECT * 
FROM `products` 
WHERE (products.name REGEXP '[[:<:]]wall[[:>:]]')  
ORDER BY products.updated_at DESC
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any explanation? –  Thorpe Obazee Apr 2 '12 at 12:03
1  
[[:<:]] and [[:>:]] are special metacharacters that match Start of word and End of word. There probably are also other special metacharacters that could have been used (like \b) –  Mircea Soaica Apr 2 '12 at 12:10

Can you try this REGEXP '[[:<:]]wall[[:>:]]'

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use TRIM(products.name) = 'wall' instead of a regex...

after question update, use mysql equivalent of \bwall\b regex (word boundaries):

'[[:<:]]word[[:>:]]'
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product name can be "wall flower" for example. this condition is not true –  safarov Apr 2 '12 at 12:03
    
i see the updated question now.. –  Aprillion Apr 2 '12 at 12:05

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