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The lambda notation has made stl algorithms more accessible. I am still learning to decide when it's useful and when to fall back to good old fashioned for-loops. Often, it becomes necessary to iterate over two (or more) containers of the same size, such that corresponding elements are related, but for some reason are not packed into the same class.

A function using a for-loop to achieve that would look like this:

template<typename Data, typename Property>
void foo(vector<Data>& data, vector<Property>& prop) {
    auto i_data = begin(data);
    auto i_prop = begin(prop);
    for (; i_data != data.end(); ++i_data, ++i_prop) {
        if (i_prop->SomePropertySatistfied()) {
            i_data->DoSomething();
        }
    }
}

In order to use for_each, I need a version of it that handles multiple ranges; something like:

template<typename InputIter1, typename InputIter2, typename Function>
Function for_each_on_two_ranges(InputIter1 first1, InputIter1 last1, InputIter2 first2, Function f) {
    for (; first1 != last1; ++first1, ++first2) {
        f(*first1, *first2);
    }
    return f;
}

With this version, the above code would look like this:

template<typename Data, typename Property>
void foo_two_ranges(vector<Data>& data, vector<Property>& prop) {
    for_each_on_two_ranges(begin(data), end(data), begin(prop), [](Data& d, Property& p) {
        if (p.SomePropertySatistfied()) {
            d.DoSomething();
        }
    });
}

Is there an equivalent way of achieving the same result using stl algorithms?

EDIT

I found the exact answer to my question in the form of boost::for_each running on boost::range. I added the answer, with example code for the sake of completeness.

share|improve this question
1  
Why not just use the for_each_two_ranges you've written already? –  Puppy Apr 2 '12 at 11:58
1  
It looks like something so common to me, that I would think it was solved by someone already –  killogre Apr 2 '12 at 12:01
6  
I think zip_iterator from Boost.Iterator does what you want. See boost.org/doc/libs/1_49_0/libs/iterator/doc/zip_iterator.html for details. –  celtschk Apr 2 '12 at 12:23
    
Thanks celtschk, I believe you're right. But the overhead in using the zip_iterator makes me lean back towards simpler schemes –  killogre Apr 2 '12 at 12:51
    
as long as the iterators themselves are separate, you're not going to be reasonably able to abstract that semantic out into the function any farther. It SEEMS like the sequences have enough implied commonality between the two iterable structures that you could make assumptions about a mapping of some kind, but you'd have to sacrifice the generic appeal of what you've done for some syntactic simplicity. I'd say that unless you're really doing this a lot, you've come up with a more than adequate solution. –  Michael Wilson Apr 2 '12 at 15:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

1) The algorithms in the STL are not meant to cover every possible case, if you need for_each_on_two_ranges then write it (as you have) and use it. The beauty of the STL is it's so extensible, and you've extended it with a useful new algo.

2) If that doesn't work, you don't have to use good old fashioned for-loops, you can use fancy new for-loops instead!

As another answer said, boost::zip_iterator is your friend here, but it doesn't have to be hard to use. Here's a solution using a range adaptor that is implemented with zip_iterator

template<typename Data, typename Property>
void foo(vector<Data>& data, vector<Property>& prop) {
    for (auto i : redi::zip(data, prop))
        if (i.get<1>().SomePropertySatistfied())
            i.get<0>.DoSomething();
}

That zip function creates an adaptor with begin() and end() members that return a boost::zip_iterator, so the loop variable is a tuple of the elements of each underlying container (and as it's a variadic template you can do it for any number of containers, so you don't need to write for_each_for_three_ranges and for_each_for_four_ranges etc.)

You could also use it with for_each

auto z = redi::zip(data, prop);
typedef decltype(z)::iterator::reference reference;

for_each(begin(z), end(z), [](reference i) {
    if (i.get<1>().SomePropertySatistfied()) {
        i.get<0>().DoSomething();
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
That looks very nice. I like the fact that it variadic, and that the code is relatively compact. I see that I need to do some homework on range adaptors. Thanks! –  killogre May 5 '12 at 17:30
    
Is redi a namespace in boost? What are the required headers? Thankee. –  Jive Dadson Aug 22 '12 at 21:27
    
@JiveDadson, no it's my own namespace, I linked the work zip to the source (and did it again now) –  Jonathan Wakely Aug 22 '12 at 21:34
    
@Jonathan Forgive me for being dense. I take it you wrote the code that's linked to. Correct? –  Jive Dadson Aug 22 '12 at 22:00
    
@JiveDadson, yes, as stated in the copyright comment at the top of the code. –  Jonathan Wakely Aug 22 '12 at 22:42

After reading up on boost::zip_iterator and boost::iterator_range as suggested by some answers, I came across the extension algorithms in boost::range, and found the exact parallel of the algorithm I wrote for two ranges, but with boost ranges.

A working code for the example would be

#include <boost/range/algorithm_ext/for_each.hpp>

template<typename Data, typename Property>
void foo_two_ranges(vector<Data>& data, vector<Property>& prop) {
    auto rng1 = boost::make_iterator_range(data.begin(), data.end());
    auto rng2 = boost::make_iterator_range(prop.begin(), prop.end());
    boost::for_each(rng1, rng2, [](Data& d, Property& p) {
        if (p.SomePropertySatistfied()) {
            d.DoSomething();
        }
    });
}

Some wrappers and utility functions, similar in mind to what @Jonathan Wakely suggested, can make this even more usable.

share|improve this answer
    
Include paths should always use / not \ even on Windoze, otherwise "path\names\like\this.hpp" will have newline and TAB characters in. Plus it makes them portable to all systems, not just Windoze. –  Jonathan Wakely Aug 22 '12 at 22:44
    
The snippet is now Unix-friendly, @JonathanWakely :) –  killogre Aug 30 '12 at 6:20
1  
Note that you can just write boost::for_each(data, prop, ...) - no need to call make_iterator_range. –  ecatmur Feb 13 '14 at 9:28

std::transform has an overload that operates on two sequences in parallel. You'd need a null output iterator to absorb the results though, if you weren't interested in collecting any.

share|improve this answer
    
for_each and transform have different semantics link. the standard requires transform to be non-mutating, but doesn't require that from for_each. Anyway, the overload you mention only works for identical forward iterators –  killogre Apr 2 '12 at 17:28
    
@Killogre: std::transform allows mutation by setting the output iterator to one of the input iterators. But yes, it's not really designed for this exact situation. –  Ben Voigt Apr 2 '12 at 18:56

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