Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to get the size of the current terminal, i.e. the terminal my perl script is running in. The following should do the job:

#!/usr/bin/perl

sub getTerminalSize {
    my @dimensions = (24,80);
    open( my $OH, '-|', "/usr/bin/tput lines ; /usr/bin/tput cols" )
        || return @dimensions;
    chomp(@dimensions = <$OH>);
    close($OH);
    return @dimensions;
}

open (STDERR, ">>bla.log") or die "can not create logfile";
print "Dimensions of your terminal: ". (join " x " , getTerminalSize()) ."\n";

Without the last but one line of code it works as it should. But with this line, I always get 24 x 80 so it seems a new shell is internally created and the size of that shell is returned. Is just my guess. So what is really happening and how do I get both - redirecting STDERR and the correct size?

share|improve this question
    
Welcome to StackOverflow. Please note that the preferred way of saying 'thanks' around here is by up-voting good questions and helpful answers (once you have enough reputation to do so), and by accepting the most helpful answer to any question you ask (which also gives you a small boost to your reputation). Please see the FAQ and especially How do I ask questions here? –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 2 '12 at 13:00
    
it's a Perl FAQ: How do I get the screen size? –  daxim Apr 2 '12 at 19:36
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For tput to identify the terminal size, one of the file descriptors for (stdin,) stdout or stderr must be open and connected to the terminal.

In the pipe construct, stdout is connect to the pipe; if you redirect stderr to a file then tput returns the default size because it does not analyze stdin.

So, tput has no terminal to work with; it returns the default size of 24x80.


You can work around the problem by adding 2>/dev/tty to the tput commands:

open my $OH, '-|', "/usr/bin/tput lines 2>/dev/tty; /usr/bin/tput cols 2>/dev/tty"
    or return @dimensions;

It appears that tput does not look at stdin at all. (Redirecting stdout to the terminal would defeat the pipe mechanism Perl is using to read the information, of course.)


$ tput lines </dev/null
65
$ tput lines </dev/null 2>/dev/null
65
$ x=$(tput lines </dev/null 2>/dev/null)
$ echo $x
24
$

I added a diagnostic print in the function to ensure that it was reading the output from tput, and it was. I added these lines to the function:

open( my $OH, '-|', "fstat /dev/fd/0 /dev/fd/1 /dev/fd/2 /dev/null")
    or die "horribly";
my(@data) = <$OH>;
close($OH);
print @data;

and the output was:

   Mode  Inode Links   UID   GID     Size    Modtime       Dev      RDev File
0020620    623     1   503     4        0 1333369875 334992488 268435457 /dev/fd/0
0010660 590945904     0   503    20        0 1333369875 334992488         0 /dev/fd/1
0100644 111429666     1   503    20        0 1333369875 334992488         0 /dev/fd/2
0020666    304     1     0     0        0 1333359963 334992488  50331650 /dev/null 

When run at the command line, the output was:

$ fstat /dev/fd/[012] /dev/null
   Mode  Inode Links   UID   GID     Size    Modtime       Dev      RDev File
0020620    623     1   503     4        0 1333370018 334992488 268435457 /dev/fd/0
0020620    623     1   503     4        0 1333370018 334992488 268435457 /dev/fd/1
0020620    623     1   503     4        0 1333370018 334992488 268435457 /dev/fd/2
0020666    304     1     0     0        0 1333359963 334992488  50331650 /dev/null
$

So, the standard input of tput was still the terminal, but tput did not look at that. Therefore, tput must have looked at stderr (it is not clear whether it tried stdout, but that was a pipe) and not at stdin. fstat is a home-brew command similar in spirit to stat, but it has a different output format.

share|improve this answer
    
well, the script above is complete, i.e. standalone so I do not see where I manipulate stdin? –  Alexander Stippler Apr 2 '12 at 12:28
    
thanks a lot so far. But as a quite perl newbie the question: How to "repair" this. How can I make my routine act as it was intended (independent of the "environment")? –  Alexander Stippler Apr 2 '12 at 12:42
1  
See extra update - tput cols 2>/dev/tty etc. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 2 '12 at 12:46
    
That's it! Thanks a lot. Incredibly fast, understandable and useful answers! –  Alexander Stippler Apr 2 '12 at 12:51
    
This is so right!!! I had the same issue with a shell script (bash) and I relaized only that 24x80 was the default and not the real size... But I didn't know/got/understood how to workaround it. If I could I'd give you 1000k points!!! –  tmow Sep 24 '13 at 14:47
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.