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I would like to call the event handler just one time, and then detach it. I tried to write:

EventHandler handler = (s, e) =>
{
    // Do something
    //
    // blabla

    // Detach the handler
    SizeChanged -= handler;
};
SizeChanged += handler;

However on the line SizeChanged -= handler I get this error

Use of unassigned local variable 'handler'

Do you have idead on how I should proceed ? I thought about using a boolean flag, but I will do that only if I can't find a way to detach the handler.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is because it really is unassigned yet. Try making a named method out of it, so the symbol is known prehand.

private void OnEvent(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    // Do something

    AnEvent -= OnEvent;
}

private void RegisterOnce()
{
    AnEvent += OnEvent;
}

I would also recommend to run the DoSmething code only after detatch and implement some locking mechanism, in case you have multithrading, to prevent from multiple threads call the event at the exact same time, not having time to detatch and therefore, all run.

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The C# compiler will first create the lambda expression you wrote before assigning the result to the variable. So when the lambda is defined, handler doesn't have a value.

It works though if you assign a value of null to EventHandler before.

Since it's a closure and local variables are captured in the closure, at the time of the call handler will have the correct value and it will work:

        EventHandler handler=null;

        handler = (s, e) =>
        {
            // Do something 
            SizeChanged -= handler;
        };
        SizeChanged += handler; 

To all people downvoting: It won't cause a NullReferenceException. handler is a local variable which is captured in the closure, so the value of handler inside the lambda will change, when it changes in the method that contains the closure. I tested it actually on my PC and it works perfectly.

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1  
if you do that, you will have null ref exception in your callback... –  Baptiste Pernet Apr 2 '12 at 12:37
2  
No, try it. The handler is captured in the closure. –  aKzenT Apr 2 '12 at 12:38
2  
Hey, don't vote me down before you even tried it!!! read up on how closures work... –  aKzenT Apr 2 '12 at 12:39
1  
I find this to be a better solution than the other! –  nawfal Apr 2 '12 at 12:40
1  
In this case you won't have a race condition, because handler will be assured to have been assigned before it's added as an event handler. In generally though I agree that you shouldn't use modified closures. –  aKzenT Apr 2 '12 at 12:43

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