Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Lets say there is setup like this:

public class MyClass
{
    public void DoSomething(string Data)
    {
      //if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(Data))
        //throw new NullReferenceException();

      //Do something with Data and let it throw??
    }
}


public class EntryPointClass
{
  public void DoIt(string Data)
  {
     var logicClass = new MyClass();

     try
     {
        logicClass.DoSomething(Data);
     }
     catch(Exception ex)
     {

     }
  }
}

In DoSomething I can detect a problem and throw an exception. In testing EntryPointClass I can test the expected outcome or test that something in happened in the catch.

Why is it better to throw an exception rather than just wait for one to happen? Either way we've caught it!

share|improve this question
3  
Bad example exception: NullReferenceException: "Note that applications throw the ArgumentNullException exception rather than the NullReferenceException exception discussed here." –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 2 '12 at 12:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You do both:

public void DoSomething(string Data)
{
  if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(Data))
    //throw new NullReferenceException();  
    throw new ArgumentException("Data");


  //Do something with Data and let it throw??
}

The aim is to throw early and provide specific information.
The direct reason to throw here is that the contract with DoSomething() is broken. Signal it, don't wait for `DoSomething() to carry on and break other contracts.

Fail fast, fail early.

share|improve this answer
    
Possibly Better:ArgumentNullException (But, then in your logic it's not always null). –  Jamiec Apr 2 '12 at 13:01
    
@Jamiec - no, I don't think you should throw ArgumentNull for whitespace. You could split the check if you wanted to be precise. –  Henk Holterman Apr 2 '12 at 13:07
    
No, I tend to agree, thats why I put the small caveat in parenthesis. Depends on the situation I might just check for null and throw a ArgNullEx - say when an empty string were valid. –  Jamiec Apr 2 '12 at 14:19

Throw your own exceptions to prevent from the outside seeing the actual source of the exception and therefore having information about you implementation.

You can throw argument exception with a custom message or a custom exception to provide more details to why the argument was invalid.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I get it but could you explain a bit more –  Steve Gates Apr 2 '12 at 12:57
    
Maybe the edit will clarify? –  Yorye Nathan Apr 2 '12 at 12:59
    
Yorye, that is a reason to re-throw at a layer/subsystem boundary. I don't think it is the core issue here. –  Henk Holterman Apr 2 '12 at 13:04
    
@HenkHolterman It is always better to throw your own exceptions to provide more information while also encapsulating. And I see your answer also suggests throwing the exception early, so what's your argument here? –  Yorye Nathan Apr 2 '12 at 13:06

The point of using Exception handling, is to handle exceptions that may be out of your control. If you're planning on wrapping your code in a try-catch block, with an exception of NullReferenceException, then you should have something in place to handle this type of exception and perform any necessary operations related to this error.

That being said, in situations where you know you may have the possibility of having an error which would throw an exception, it is better to check for this situation -- and not throw an error at all, but gracefully handle it. Otherwise you're just coding by exception, which is an anti-pattern.

Remember, exceptions are exactly that, exceptions to your rules, and not a catch-all for anything that may go wrong in the execution of your code.

share|improve this answer
    
So in the sample above you're saying I should gracefully handle it and not throw a exception? –  Steve Gates Apr 2 '12 at 13:15

Think of exception as of a man who jumps out of a burning house and crying for help: You do not want them to scare general populace, but you do want them to notify right people to do something about the fire. With that in mind:

1) If you have something wrong in DoSomething AND you know how to fix it - you do not need an exception : just fix it inside DoSomething.

2) If DoSomething is in trouble handling the issue (wrong attribute, resources unavailable, etc..) - use exception to ESCALATE the issue and handle it on a level where such handling is possible.

3) If DoSomething is screwed in a way you cannot influence in any way (like filesystem crash and IO exceptions everywhere) - just catch an exception, log it and shutdown gracefully - at least such situation will not look like an implosion.

share|improve this answer

One set of circumstances where you shouldn't attempt to detect an error condition ahead of time, rather than just letting the code fail, is where there is a dependency on an external resource, outside of your code's control. E.g. anything dealing with the network, file system, etc.

The issue with any of these is that the checking code can succeed and then the actual operation can still fail. All you've done by adding checking code is increased the amount of code you've written - you still have to write code to deal with actual failures anyway.

share|improve this answer

Eric Lippert has a great article on Exception.

Please follow the link. It is very good resource on how exceptions should be handled.

As a rule of thumb, try to avoid the exceptions rather than trying to handle the exception. And dont catch all the exceptions. I see Catch(Exception ex) in your code. Catch the exception which you can handle. There is nothing much you can do when you get OutofMemoryException, ThreadAbortException

I agree with Henk Holterman.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.