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I have an array in this format:

[ 
  { day: 1
    intervals: [
      {
        from: 900,
        to: 1200
      }
    ]
  },
  { day: 2
    intervals: [
      {
        from: 900,
        to: 1200
      }
    ]
  },
  { day: 3
    intervals: [
      {
        from: 900,
        to: 1200
      }
    ]
  },
  { day: 4
    intervals: [
      {
        from: 900,
        to: 1200
      }
    ]
  },
  { day: 5
    intervals: [
      {
        from: 900,
        to: 1200
      }
    ]
  },
  { day: 6
    intervals: [
      {
        from: 900,
        to: 1200
      },
      {
        from: 1300,
        to: 2200
      }
    ]
  },
  { day: 7
    intervals: [
      {
        from: 900,
        to: 1200
      },
      {
        from: 1300,
        to: 2200
      }
    ]
  }
]

I wan't to group them like this:

[ 
  { day: 1-5
    intervals: [
      {
        from: 900,
        to: 1200
      }
    ]
  },
  { day: 6-7
    intervals: [
      {
        from: 900,
        to: 1200
      },
      {
        from: 1300,
        to: 2200
      }
    ]
  }
]

Criteria:

  • Only group if intervals are the same.
  • Only group if matches are in chronological order, i.e 1-5 or 1-3, not 1-2-5.

How can this be achieved?

share|improve this question
    
Note that your example output does not fulfill the 2nd requirement. 6-7 is only 2 days. –  undur_gongor Apr 2 '12 at 15:01
    
Oh, you're right! Deleted that criteria. Thanks! –  Yeggeps Apr 2 '12 at 15:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a variation of @joelparkerhenderson's solution that tries to be a bit closer to your requirements re formatting of the output etc.

output = []

grouped = input.group_by do |x|
  x[:intervals]
end

grouped.each_pair do |k, v|
  days = v.map {|day| day[:day]}
  if days.each_cons(2).all? { |d1, d2| d1.next == d2 }
    output << {
      :days => days.values_at(0,-1).join('-'),
      :intervals => k
    }
  end
end

puts output
share|improve this answer
    
If days 1, 2, 3, 5 have the same intervals, your code will not group 1-3, right? –  undur_gongor Apr 3 '12 at 7:37
    
True enough, this certainly can be improved. –  Michael Kohl Apr 3 '12 at 8:52
    
I found this to be the best starting point for my problem, thanks a lot! –  Yeggeps Apr 3 '12 at 19:23

Extending @Michael Kohl's answer

output = []

grouped = schedules.as_json.group_by do |x|
  x['intervals']
end

grouped.each_pair do |k, v|
  days = v.map {|day| day['day']}
  grouped_days = days.inject([[]]) do |grouped, num|
    if grouped.last.count == 0 or grouped.last.last == num - 1
      grouped.last << num
    else
      grouped << [ num ]
    end
    grouped
  end

  grouped_days.each do |d|
    output << {
      heading: d.values_at(0, -1).uniq.join('-'),
      interval: k
    }
  end
end

output

You should probably split that up into separate methods, but you get the idea.

share|improve this answer

This produces the required output:

by_interval = data.inject({}) do | a, e |
  i = e[:intervals]
  a[i] ||= []
  a[i] << e[:day].to_i
  a
end

result = by_interval.map do | interval, days |
  slices = days.sort.inject([]) do | a, e |
    a << [] if a == [] || a.last.last != e - 1
    a.last << e
    a
  end
  slices.map do | slice |
      {:day => "#{slice.first}-#{slice.last}", :intervals => interval }
  end
end
result.flatten!

I'm sure there are better approaches :-)

share|improve this answer

You need to look into Map Method for an array. You need to remap the array and iterate over it to extract the data you want using your "grouping" logic above.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, thanks for your answer, I do know about map/collect, Having trouble comparing all the day hashes with each other though. –  Yeggeps Apr 2 '12 at 14:18

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