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I'm teaching myself .NET c# through books and self-assigned projects for fun. I thought it could be a good experience to try and create my own image click captcha control from scratch. The kind where you identify "the right image" from a few options and click the right one (the cat or something) to identify yourself as human.

As I was trying to think of all the ways a script might learn its way around whatever I create, I considered the possibility that it could simply learn the right answers from trial-error and saving the filenames of each image. Eventually it'd learn which filenames were the "right ones"

I can't think of any way to actually hide an image filename from a browser or source code, but renaming them every go-through isn't practical either. Is there some way I could "render" the images in some sort of custom MIME type (is that the right question? i'm new sorry) each time they're requested instead of just throwing out IMG SRC's?

This might just be impossible, but figured I'd try asking the experts. Thanks for your time!

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stackoverflow.com/faq –  Diodeus Apr 2 '12 at 13:47
    
try here:aspsnippets.com/Articles/… –  Ashwini Verma Apr 2 '12 at 14:04
    
thank you i will –  korben Apr 2 '12 at 14:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you do is provide a proxy for the images:

<img src="imageServer.aspx?id=12345" />

What you do at your end it send the MIME header, then stream out the file. This way there is no direct relation between the image that is served and a particular filename.

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that sounds fascinating and like a great option, is there any links you could provide to send me down the road of learning this? I know nothing at this time on mime headers, streaming files, etc. Even suggesting a few google search terms would help me on my way (beyond the obvious ones from your post) - thanks for your input –  korben Apr 2 '12 at 13:53
    
There is an answer here on the site somewhere. I'm trying to find it. –  Diodeus Apr 2 '12 at 13:54
    
Here you go: stackoverflow.com/questions/4684673/… –  Diodeus Apr 2 '12 at 13:59
    
that answer looks good for when I mostly understand the process and need to figure out the gritty code. I'm still a little fuzzy on exactly what happens here but i'll hit google with the general idea. thanks –  korben Apr 2 '12 at 14:09

You can create Bitmap class from the loaded Image and save the image, used to generate bitmap somewhere to validate user input

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so basically saving a few new images each go-round for the captcha use? I'm fine with that if you are but I can't speak for any load implications with this scenario. I like to pretend I'm building for a big site (that can pay a salary) when I'm working on things so I try not to learn how to do things that can only support a developer using it. –  korben Apr 2 '12 at 13:51

There's a good example of dynamic image creation on the MSDN site here

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.web.httpresponse.outputstream.aspx

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checking it out now thank you –  korben Apr 2 '12 at 14:07

I would recommend to use a generic handler (*.ashx) for this. Much less overhead and a cleaner way to load an image that calling an aspx page.

I've used generic handlers for image purposes countless times. For instance you can provide server-side resizing. Another cool feature would be accessing session values, like "only show the image if the user is logged in"

Looking at http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/34084/Generic-Image-Handler-Using-IHttpHandler might be a good start.

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appreciate it thanks, i'll check this out –  korben Apr 9 '12 at 17:09

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