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Header file:

// pe10-8arr.h -- header file for a simple list class

#ifndef SIMPLEST_
#define SIMPLEST_

// program-specific declarations
const int TSIZE = 45;      // size of array to hold title
struct film
{
    char title[TSIZE];
    int rating;
};

// general type definitions
typedef struct film Item;

const int MAXLIST = 10;
class simplist
{
private:
    Item items[MAXLIST];
    int count;
public:
    simplist(void);
 bool isempty(void);
 bool isfull(void);
    int itemcount();
 bool additem(Item item);
    void transverse( void (*pfun)(Item &item));
};

#endif

Code using header:

#include "pe10-8arr.h"

simplist::simplist(void)
{
    count = 0;
}

bool simplist::isempty(void)
{
    return count == 0;
}

bool simplist::isfull(void)
{
    return count == MAXLIST;
}

int simplist::itemcount()
{
    return count;
}
bool simplist::additem(Item item)
{
    if (count == MAXLIST)
        return false;
    else
        items[count++] = item;
    return true;
}

void simplist::transverse( void (*pfun)(Item &item))
{
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        (*pfun)(items[i]);
}

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>         // prototype for exit()
#include "pe10-8arr.h"     // simple list class declaration
                                // array version
void showmovies(Item &item); // to be used by transverse()

int main(void)
{
    using namespace std;
    simplist movies;     // creates an empty list
    Item temp;

    if (movies.isfull())    // invokes isfull() member function
    {
        cout << "No more room in list! Bye!\n";
        exit(1);
    }
    cout << "Enter first movie title:\n";
    while (cin.getline(temp.title,TSIZE) && temp.title[0] != '\0')
    {
        cout << "Enter your rating <0-10>: ";
        cin >> temp.rating;
        while(cin.get() != '\n')
            continue;
        if (movies.additem(temp) == false)
        {
            cout << "List already is full!\n";
            break;
        }
        if (movies.isfull())
        {
            cout << "You have filled the list.\n";
            break;
        }
        cout << "Enter next movie title (empty line to stop):\n";
    }
    if (movies.isempty())
        cout << "No data entered. ";
    else
    {
        cout << "Here is the movie list:\n";
        movies.transverse(showmovies);
    }
    cout << "Bye!\n";
    return 0;
}

void showmovies(Item &item)
{
        std::cout << "Movie: " << item.title << "  Rating: "
             << item.rating << std::endl;

}

The code above just compile and run successfully. Can anyone tell me why the function showmovies() can access the item member of simplist using reference without being declared as friend function or member function?

share|improve this question
3  
I'm not quite sure what you're asking; showmovies is using the item parameter you passed directly to it; it's not touching simplist –  Michael Mrozek Apr 2 '12 at 15:18
    
showmovies doesn't call member functions, it only gets fields from an Item struct. –  Wouter Huysentruit Apr 2 '12 at 15:20
2  
Everything is public by default in a struct. –  BoBTFish Apr 2 '12 at 15:20
    
... which I guess relates to struct film, who's members are public by default. –  trojanfoe Apr 2 '12 at 15:20
    
void simplist::transverse( void (*pfun)(Item &item)) { for (int i = 0; i < count; i++) (*pfun)(items[i]); //item member of simplist class is accessed successfully in the function. } –  JDein Apr 2 '12 at 15:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The function is handed an Item object (by reference), it does not know or care where it came from. The caller of the function is the one that actually pulled the object from inside the complete object, but transverse has access by being a member of the class.

share|improve this answer
    
but the function pointer has no access to the member of simplist class –  JDein Apr 2 '12 at 15:29
    
@JDein: It does not access the member of simplist, it access the object that is passed by reference. Consider that you leave the keys to your house to a friend, the friend goes in, borrows a DVD and gives it to me. Do I need to be your friend for me to watch the DVD? Am I breaking into your house? No, someone that you trusted and had access entered your house, picked the object and gave it to me. I don't even know if it came from your house of the rental next door. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 2 '12 at 16:07
    
But in that way, anyone who got the keys to my house can modify the contents in my house, doesn't that sound like a bug?? –  JDein Apr 3 '12 at 3:01
    
consider the code below, showmovies can modify the data member of class simplist. void showmovies(Item &item) { cout<<"original contents..."<<endl; std::cout << "Movie: " << item.title << " Rating: " << item.rating << std::endl; cout<<"After modified the contents..."<<endl; strcpy(item.title,"modified"); item.rating=0; std::cout << "Movie: " << item.title << " Rating: " << item.rating << std::endl; } –  JDein Apr 3 '12 at 3:10
    
@JDein: That is by design. Only someone with access to the class internals can use that access to extract the member and pass it to your showmovies. Trusted code decided to pass the Item object to that function, knowingly, probably expecting the side effect. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 3 '12 at 12:32

Default visibility for structure members is public. That function only uses Item, not simplist.

share|improve this answer

showMovies takes an Item as parameter. It doesn't care if it's a member or not.

Item is a struct, its fields are public unless otherwise declared.

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inside simplist:

void simplist::transverse( void (*pfun)(Item &item))
{
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        (*pfun)(items[i]);
}

You are calling showmovies from transverse (a simplist's member), so you can access all the class attributes regardless visibility.

share|improve this answer
    
Sounds like a bug, isn't it. –  JDein Apr 2 '12 at 15:36
    
Why should that be a bug? –  Carl Norum Apr 2 '12 at 16:57
    
consider the code below, I can modify the data member of simplist class in function showmovies() void showmovies(Item &item) { cout<<"original contents..."<<endl; std::cout << "Movie: " << item.title << " Rating: " << item.rating << std::endl; cout<<"After modified the contents..."<<endl; strcpy(item.title,"modified"); item.rating=0; std::cout << "Movie: " << item.title << " Rating: " << item.rating << std::endl; } –  JDein Apr 3 '12 at 3:08

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