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Is there a cross-platform way to get current date and time in c++?

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12 Answers 12

up vote 55 down vote accepted

std C libraries provide time(). This is seconds from the epoch and can be converted to date and H:M:S using standard C functions. Boost also has a time/date library that you can check.

time_t  timev;
time(&timev)
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17  
@Yannbane : Perhaps the answer-provider isn't the one to punish in this instance? People don't usually vote down an answer because it isn't as good as the others... But I suspect the issue may be because the OP chose this as the answer? –  Jace Mar 5 '13 at 1:18
    
The name of the function time, and variable name time collide. –  Lefteris E Sep 10 '13 at 7:10

C++ shares its date/time functions with C. The tm structure is probably the easiest for a C++ programmer to work with - the following prints today's date:

#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    time_t t = time(0);   // get time now
    struct tm * now = localtime( & t );
    cout << (now->tm_year + 1900) << '-' 
         << (now->tm_mon + 1) << '-'
         <<  now->tm_mday
         << endl;
}
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10  
Use ctime() together with this answer if you want a date string. –  ralphtheninja Jun 15 '09 at 19:42
    
what about deleting the instance of struct tm is it possible to just call delete on it? –  Petr Aug 8 at 13:59
    
@Petr you only need to call delete on memory allocated with new. –  iheanyi Aug 15 at 16:52
    
ok but still you get a pointer from localtime() so the structure instance gets allocated on heap or not? which means it doesn't get cleaned unless you do that somehow. I never said use delete (c++ keyword) on it, I just thought it should be deleted somehow :) or who is going to do that for you? –  Petr Aug 23 at 9:46
    
@Petr You don't need to deallocate it because it is allocated statically, see here for this topic stackoverflow.com/questions/8694365/… –  Brandin Aug 29 at 21:09

You can try the following cross-platform code to get current date/time:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

// Get current date/time, format is YYYY-MM-DD.HH:mm:ss
const std::string currentDateTime() {
    time_t     now = time(0);
    struct tm  tstruct;
    char       buf[80];
    tstruct = *localtime(&now);
    // Visit http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/chrono/c/strftime
    // for more information about date/time format
    strftime(buf, sizeof(buf), "%Y-%m-%d.%X", &tstruct);

    return buf;
}

int main() {
    std::cout << "currentDateTime()=" << currentDateTime() << std::endl;
    getchar();  // wait for keyboard input
}

Output:

currentDateTime()=2012-05-06.21:47:59

Please visit here for more information about date/time format

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1  
Excellent! Thanks! –  Chaki_Black Apr 1 '13 at 20:54
    
Very good indeed. This is exactly what I was looking for! Cheers –  marcelosalloum Jul 6 '13 at 17:25
    
Hello. I have a little problem with this "buf" allocation inside the function "currentDateTime()". How is it supposed to persist after the function has returned? Thx. –  Léa Massiot Jun 16 at 10:41
1  
The return type is "const std::string", so it is returned by value and then a copy of buffer is made, before releasing it. –  barranquero Jul 1 at 8:17

the C++ standard library does not provide a proper date type. C++ inherits the structs and functions for date and time manipulation from C, along with a couple of date/time input and output functions that take into account localization.

// Current date/time based on current system
time_t now = time(0);

// Convert now to tm struct for local timezone
tm* localtm = localtime(&now);
cout << "The local date and time is: " << asctime(localtm) << endl;

// Convert now to tm struct for UTC
tm* gmtm = gmtime(&now);
if (gmtm != NULL) {
cout << "The UTC date and time is: " << asctime(gmtm) << endl;
}
else {
cerr << "Failed to get the UTC date and time" << endl;
return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
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#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

int main ()
{
  time_t rawtime;
  struct tm * timeinfo;

  time ( &rawtime );
  timeinfo = localtime ( &rawtime );
  printf ( "Current local time and date: %s", asctime (timeinfo) );

  return 0;
} 
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(For fellow googlers)

There is also Boost::date_time :

#include <boost/date_time/posix_time/posix_time.hpp>

boost::posix_time::ptime date_time = boost::posix_time::microsec_clock::universal_time();
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Yes and you can do so with formatting rules specified by the currently-imbued locale:

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <string>

class timefmt
{
public:
    timefmt(std::string fmt)
        : format(fmt) { }

    friend std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream &, timefmt const &);

private:
    std::string format;
};

std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& os, timefmt const& mt)
{
    std::ostream::sentry s(os);

    if (s)
    {
        std::time_t t = std::time(0);
        std::tm const* tm = std::localtime(&t);
        std::ostreambuf_iterator<char> out(os);

        std::use_facet<std::time_put<char>>(os.getloc())
            .put(out, os, os.fill(),
                 tm, &mt.format[0], &mt.format[0] + mt.format.size());
    }

    os.width(0);

    return os;
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << timefmt("%c");
}

Output: Fri Sep 6 20:33:31 2013

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This is, IMHO, actually the best answer, since it is the only one that honors locale settings, and because it is programmed with such attention to detail (you don't see ostream::sentry that often). –  DevSolar Oct 11 '13 at 20:24
    
@DevSolar Thanks. I wouldn't say it's the best though. I've seen better implementations. But I think this suffices for an example :) –  0x499602D2 Oct 11 '13 at 20:31
    
Didn't compile for me. Being a novice I cannot comment on why. –  historystamp Nov 13 '13 at 16:47
    
@historystamp What was the error? –  0x499602D2 Nov 13 '13 at 16:49

There's always the __TIMESTAMP__ preprocessor macro.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std

void printBuildDateTime () {
    cout << __TIMESTAMP__ << endl;
}

int main() {
    printBuildDateTime();
}

example: Sun Apr 13 11:28:08 2014

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This will not work as TIMESTAMP will give the time when the file is created rather than the current time. –  feelfree Aug 11 at 13:41

You can also directly use ctime():

#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>

int main ()
{
  time_t rawtime;
  struct tm * timeinfo;

  time ( &rawtime );
  printf ( "Current local time and date: %s", ctime (&rawtime) );

  return 0;
} 
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2  
in VS2012 i have to add #define _CRT_SECURE_NO_DEPRECATE before include to make program compiles –  javapowered May 4 '13 at 6:30

The ffead-cpp provides multiple utility classes for various tasks, one such class is the Date class which provides a lot of features right from Date operations to date arithmetic, there's also a Timer class provided for timing operations. You can have a look at the same.

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#include <Windows.h>

void main()
{
     //Following is a structure to store date / time

SYSTEMTIME SystemTime, LocalTime;

    //To get the local time

int loctime = GetLocalTime(&LocalTime);

    //To get the system time

int systime = GetSystemTime(&SystemTime)

}
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http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/ctime/strftime/

This built-in seems to offer a reasonable set of options.

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Any code samples maybe? –  Ilya Luzyanin Aug 7 at 17:38
    
Sure: time_t rawTime; time(&rawTime); struct tm *timeInfo; char buf[80]; timeInfo = localtime(&rawTime); strftime(buf, 80, "%T", timeInfo); This particular one just puts the HH:MM:SS. My first post so I m not sure how to get the code format correct. Sorry about that. –  bduhbya Aug 7 at 21:19

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