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I want to delete all the elements from my list:

foreach (Session session in m_sessions)
{
    m_sessions.Remove(session);
}

In the last element I get an exception: UnknownOperation.

Anyone know why?

how should I delete all the elements? It is ok to write something like this:

m_sessions = new List<Session>();
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9  
m_Sessions.Clear() ? –  L.B Apr 2 '12 at 16:37
    
try list.Clear(). –  Aseem Gautam Apr 2 '12 at 16:37
    
Are you sure you get all the way to the last element, I would think you would get an exception on the first attempt to modify a list which is used for iteration –  musefan Apr 2 '12 at 16:39
    
It is strange that you are not getting the concurrent modification exception. –  dasblinkenlight Apr 2 '12 at 16:40
    
@dasblinkenlight you are right, I had only one element so I got it on the first and on the last –  janneob Apr 2 '12 at 16:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You aren't allowed to modify a List<T> whilst iterating over it with foreach. Use m_sessions.Clear() instead.

Whilst you could write m_sessions = new List<Session>() this is not a good idea. For a start it is wasteful to create a new list just to clear out an existing one. What's more, if you have other references to the list then they will continue to refer to the old list. Although, as @dasblinkenlight points out, m_sessions is probably a private member and it's unlikely you have other references to the list. No matter, Clear() is the canonical way to clear a List<T>.

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Exactly, on with a list iterator can you safely modify a list while traversing over it. Iterators know of the previous / next nodes and are designed for modifications. Standard for loop macros and while loops do not. –  Mike McMahon Apr 2 '12 at 16:40
    
+1 However, assuming that m_ stands for member, and that it is also private, having other references to m_sessions would indicate problems at a deeper level. –  dasblinkenlight Apr 2 '12 at 16:42
    
Why would m_sessions = new .. ; (or m_sessions = null for that matter, wich is what I am reading into this) actually clear the list? –  Captain Giraffe Apr 2 '12 at 16:43
    
@CaptainGiraffe No, the old list would not be cleared, but m_sessions would be referring to a different list, a new instance. –  David Heffernan Apr 2 '12 at 16:46
    
Ok, -"wasteful to create a new list just to clear out an existing one. ". Clear out = Get out of sight. –  Captain Giraffe Apr 2 '12 at 16:49

Never, ever, modify a collection that is being iterated on with foreach. Inserting, deleting, and reordering are no-nos. You may, however, modify the foreach variable (session in this case).

In this case, use

m_sessions.Clear();

and eliminate the loop.

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