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This is a programming exercise from Chapter 6 of The Art and Science of Java.

Implement a new class called Card that includes the following entries:

• Named constants for the four suits (CLUBS, DIAMONDS, HEARTS, SPADES) and the four ranks that are traditionally represented in words (ACE, JACK, QUEEN, KING). The values of the rank constants should be 1, 11, 12, and 13, respectively.

• A constructor that takes a rank and a suit and returns a Card with those values.

• Getter methods named getRank and getSuit to retrieve the rank and suit components of a card.

• An implementation of the toString method that returns the complete name of the card as in exercise 1. Remember that you can use the + operator to connect the different parts of the string together, as shown in the toString implementation for the Rational class in Figure 6-9.

My code:

/*
 * File: Card.java
 * 
 */

public class Card {

    /* Named Constants for ranks*/
    public static final int ACE = 1;
    public static final int JACK = 11;
    public static final int QUEEN = 12;
    public static final int KING = 13;

    /* Named Constants for suits*/
    public static final int CLUBS = 1;
    public static final int DIAMONDS  = 2;
    public static final int HEARTS = 3;
    public static final int SPADES = 4;

    public Card(int rank, int suit) {
        cardRank = rank;
        cardSuit = suit;
    }

    public int getRank() {
        return cardRank;
    }

    public int getSuit() {
        return cardSuit;
    }

    public String toString() {      
        return (toRankName() + " of " + toSuitName());
    }

    private String toRankName() {
        switch (cardRank) {
        case 1:
            return ("Ace");
        case 11:
            return ("Jack");
        case 12:
            return ("Queen");
        case 13:
            return ("King");
        default:
            return ("" + cardRank);
        }
    }

    private String toSuitName() {
        switch (cardSuit) {
        case 1:
            return ("Clubs");
        case 2:
            return ("Diamonds");
        case 3:
            return ("Hearts");
        case 4:
            return ("Spades");
        default:
            return ("Invalid");
        }
    }

    private int cardRank;
    private int cardSuit;
}

The part that I am unsure of is "Getter methods named getRank and getSuit to retrieve the rank and suit components of a card."

Is the question asking me to return the int value or a String value(Name)?

This is the first time I've implemented a class. Apart from the lack of JavaDoc comments, is there anything else wrong with my code?

edit: Many thanks to everyone that replied!

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Your code looks ok but the book seems quite outdated... –  assylias Apr 2 '12 at 16:43
    
put an @Override in front of the public String toString() method: this signals that you are overriding a methof of a parent class (in this case Object), not creating a new method that appears in your class only –  Attila Apr 2 '12 at 16:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code looks spot-on as far as the requirements are concerned.

The only suggestion I have is to use the named constants in the two switch statements:

private String toRankName() {
    switch (cardRank) {
    case ACE:
        return ("Ace");
    case JACK:
        return ("Jack");
    ...

The requirements seem a little odd in that they force you to use named constants where enums would arguably be more appropriate.

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Thanks! The book won't introduce enums until chapter 8, I think that's why it's asking for named constants. –  user1296058 Apr 2 '12 at 17:32

Is the question asking me to return the int value or a String value(Name)?

The explanation you quote is not specific about the type of the suit constants, so to me int is fine. And getters by convention return the type of the corresponding field.

is there anything else wrong with my code?

I don't see anything obviously wrong, although there are a couple of things which could be improved (but I guess most of these come only in later chapters of the book, so feel free to skip these until then):

  • converting cardRank to String is better done using e.g. String.valueOf(cardRank), rather than "" + cardRank
  • since you don't want a card to change its rank or suit, you could declare the fields cardRank and cardSuit final to enforce this
  • you should be consistent in dealing with unexpected rank and suit values in toRankName and toSuitName - is it an error to find a car with an unknown suit or rank? If so, you should throw an exception rather than returning another string
  • ideally, such types with a closed set of possible values would be implemented using one or more enums. This would make your switch statements unnecessary, and also guarantee that no unexpected suits or ranks can occur
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for the suggestions –  user1296058 Apr 2 '12 at 17:33

I would interpret it the same way you did. getRank and getSuit are more useful the way they're implemented now, if you are going to use this class in some kind of program that cares about their values. For instance, if you write a poker playing program, you'd wouldnt want to do a string compare just to check the rank of a card, so having the accessors return into is beneficial.

You ask if anything else is wrong with your class- the way it's implemented does meet the requirements of the question, but I take issue with the question itself. I think it would be cleaner to implement suit and rank as enums, which would help prevent the creation of invalid card objects with a compile time check. If you don't know about enums, check

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/enum.html

You could also put a check in your constructor to make sure only valid params are passed in, and throw an exception if they're not. These tips are probably beyond the scope of the question, but I suggest them because stylistically I think they lead to less error prone code.

Cheers!

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I think you implemented it exactly like you were supposed to.

I don't see anything wrong with the code, except that I'm not really a fan of named constants and would implement this using enums, but as it was the requirement...

Edit: Since you pass in the values of rank and suite as int values in the constructor, you should also returns them like this in the getter methods. Calling code should use these methods together with the named constants to implement logic instead of using string values here.

As aix pointed out you should do the same inside your own code (use the contant names instead of magic numbers).

Edit: To implement this using enums, I would do it as follows:

public enum Suit
{
    CLUB("Club"), DIAMOND("Diamond"), HEART("Heart"), SPADE("Spade");

    String name;
    Suit(String name)
    {
        this.name=name;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString()
    {
        return name;
    }
}

public enum Rank
{
    ACE("Ace", 1), JACK("Jack", 11), QUEEN("Queen", 12), KING("King", 13); //add other cards

    int value;
    String name;
    Rank(String name, int value)
    {
        this.name=name;
        this.value=value;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString()
    {
        return name;
    }
}

public class Card { 

    public Card(Rank rank, Suit suit) { 
        cardRank = rank; 
        cardSuit = suit; 
    } 

    public Rank getRank() { 
        return cardRank; 
    } 

    public Suit getSuit() { 
        return cardSuit; 
    } 

    @Override
    public String toString() {       
        return (cardRank + " of " + cardSuit); 
    } 

    private Rank cardRank; 
    private Suit cardSuit; 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the sample code. It will help me a lot when I get to the chapter about enum –  user1296058 Apr 2 '12 at 17:33

Get/Set methods usually return the type of the member variable they are associated with. In your case the getSuit() is associated with cardSuit and getRank is associated with cardRank.

Note that this is not a requirement: you could return a String representation if you wanted, it usually depends on the purpose of the code.

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