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I have three classes: ClassA, ClassB, ClassC.

ClassC extends ClassB which in turn extends ClassA.

When I call GetType() from ClassA's constructor, .net is returning ClassC's type. I'm baffled because this is happening in code that has been working for a while and which I haven't touch in a while. Was there a hotfix to .net that changed the behavior of GetType()? I doubt that. My only other thought is that this has something to do with xUnit, the testing framework I'm using?

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all - thanks! everyone seem to be saying the same thing...that this is working as expected and as it always has. –  SFun28 Apr 2 '12 at 17:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's behaving exactly as it's supposed to. GetType() returns the actual type of the instance of the object, even if it's a subclass (and it has always behaved this way). typeof(ClassA) on the other hand would always give you the type for ClassA.

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wow, never even thought about it, excellent info –  Habib Apr 2 '12 at 17:37
    
bizarre...I'm not sure how my unit tests would have passed. Anyways, it seems that I should be using typeof() –  SFun28 Apr 2 '12 at 17:41

If I right understood your problem, you have a ClassA a type, and by calling it you get ClassC. If so, it's most probabbly not a real ClassA object but it's something like this:

Somewhere in the code you have an initialization like following:

ClassA a = new ClassC().

Considering that ClassC : ClassB and ClassB : ClassA you can do that.

GetType() returns a real object type and not actual wrapper type.

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As far as I can remember, GetType() has always returned the type of the instance, not the base class, regardless of where it is called.

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The GetType function is behaving as expected. It should always return the actual runtime type of the value. I don't believe any hot patches have changed this behavior but the behavior you are seeing now is definitiely correct.

If you want to see the declared type of the method instead then use one of the following

typeof(TheContainingType)
MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().DeclaringType
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