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How do I pass back a local variable from a function to main, if said function already has a return value? Sorry for the question, I'm trying to make it as objective as possible for everyone, not just my case.

Specifically: I have a function called subtotal. There are two counting variables. One of them I returned with a return. The other I need to make available for use by my main() function.

edit: To clarify:

function something() {
   float counter = 0.0;
   int someOtherVar = 0;

   // the work

   return someOtherVar;
}

What I want to do is pass the counter float to main.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Pass a pointer to the extra return value as a parameter to the function.

int foo(int *anotherOutParam)
{
    *anotherOutParam = 1;
    return 2;
}

And to call it:

int ret1, ret2;
ret1 = foo(&ret2);
//do something with ret2

Oftentimes, @Mat's suggestion of packing all the return values into a struct is preferable.

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Thanks, got it, I added some clarification to my question though. –  eveo Apr 2 '12 at 18:39
    
The code in my answer essentially implements what you describe in your clarification. Replace int *anotherOutParam with float *counter and you are done. –  David Heffernan Apr 2 '12 at 18:47
    
Problem is I defined it as float *count; which is fine, but then I try to do count += anotherVar; and it gives me this error: invalid operands to binary + (have 'float *' and 'double'). –  eveo Apr 2 '12 at 18:52
    
Very hard to debug this from here. Is count a local variable or is it the pointer parameter passed to the function? If the former then that doesn't make much sense. If the latter then you increment by writing *count += anotherVar. –  David Heffernan Apr 2 '12 at 18:54
    
It is a local variable. Okay that worked, but now how can I reference it and change it's value in other functions and in main? I need to send that local variable to main and other functions as well –  eveo Apr 2 '12 at 18:59
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Put all your return values in a struct, and return that.

#include <stdio.h>

struct myret {
    int total;
    int count;
};

struct myret foo(void)
{
    struct myret r;
    r.total = 42;
    r.count = 2;
    return r;
}

int main(void)
{
    struct myret r = foo();
    printf("%d %d\n", r.total, r.count);
    return 0;
}

Or use pointers for the "other" return values.

int foo(int *other)
{
   if (other)
     *other=42;
   return 1;
}

int main(void)
{
   int a = 0;
   int b = foo(&a);
   ...
}

You can also combine both by passing a pointer to a struct to your function, and have your function fill that in:

#include <stdio.h>

struct myret {
    int total;
    int count;
};

int foo(struct myret *r)
{
    if (r) {
        r->total = 42;
        r->count = 2;
    }
    return 0;
}

int main(void)
{
    struct myret r;
    int rc = foo(&r);
    if (rc == 0) {
        printf("%d %d\n", r.total, r.count);
    }
    return rc;
}
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+1: Whilst "returning" individual parameters via the argument list works, encapsulating it like the first example is much cleaner, and so should normally be preferred. –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 2 '12 at 18:18
    
+1 I agree, returning an encapsulated struct is the way to go –  David Heffernan Apr 2 '12 at 18:19
    
Only do this if all the elements of the struct are logically related to each other (IOW, they're attributes of a larger, composite type); don't create an aggregate type for the sole purpose of returning multiple unrelated items from a function. –  John Bode Apr 2 '12 at 18:20
2  
@JohnBode: a single function probably shouldn't be 'calculating' completely unrelated things. –  Mat Apr 2 '12 at 18:26
    
Haven't learned structs yet, therefore I am not allowed to use structs. –  eveo Apr 2 '12 at 18:32
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