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I think code is pretty clear to understand. Fcn takes the grades of students from the user; display the grades on the screen.

Why this program does not work correctly?

int takeGrade1(int *grades){
    int i, noStudents;
    cout << "No of students: "; 
    cin >> noStudents;
    grades = new int[noStudents];
    for (i = 0; i < noStudents; i++){
        cout << "Enter the grade: ";
        cin >> grades[i];
    }
    return noStudents;
}
int main(){
    int *studentGrades, no, i;
    no = takeGrade1(studentGrades);
    cout << endl << "Grades: " << endl;
    for (i = 0; i < no; i++)
        cout << studentGrades[i] << endl;
    delete []studentGrades;
    return 0;
}

Output should be like:

No of students: 3
Enter the grade: 89
Enter the grade: 56
Enter the grade: 76

Grades: 
89
56
76

But it is like:

No of students: 3
Enter the grade: 89
Enter the grade: 56
Enter the grade: 76

Grades: 
-1073743257
0
-1073743249

ADDITION:

You said that "it doesn't modify studentGrades" but in following case, studentGrades[0] can get a value. So it can be modified in this case, despite what you said. Can you please explain me what is the differance between both cases?

int takeGrade1(int *grades){
    int i, noStudents = 3;
    for (i = 0; i < noStudents; i++){
        cout << "Enter the grade: ";
        cin >> grades[i];
    }
    return noStudents;
}
int main(){
    int *studentGrades, no, i;
    studentGrades = new int[3];
    no = takeGrade1(studentGrades);
    cout << endl << "Grades: " << endl;
    for (i = 0; i < no; i++)
        cout << studentGrades[i] << endl;
    delete []studentGrades;
    return 0;
}
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You are reading from garbage that's why you have weird values being printed. –  user195488 Apr 2 '12 at 18:45

4 Answers 4

Next line doesn't do what you want :

no = takeGrade1(studentGrades);

because it doesn't modify studentGrades.

If you change the signature of the function to this :

int takeGrade1(int *&grades)

then it will work as intended.

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Your first issue is that if you allocate memory inside of a function you can't pass in a pointer as the calling function can't observe changes to the pointer. You have to pass in a pointer to a pointer or a reference to a pointer if you are in c++.

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Rewrite the code by allocate memory for 'grades' in main and then pass the pointer to the function so that you can avoid rewriting your pointer when you do new

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The takeGrade1 argument has to be a pointer to array (or pointer to pointer). And you should give it the address of the pointer in the caller frame:

int takeGrade1(int **grades) {
    // snip
    *grades = new int[noStudents];
    // snip
}

int main(){
    int *studentGrades, no, i;
    no = takeGrade1(&studentGrades);
    // snip
}

But, to be more C++ idiomatic, you should probably be using references:

int takeGrade1(int *&grades) {
    // snip
    grades = new int[noStudents];
    // snip
}

int main(){
    int *studentGrades, no, i;
    no = takeGrade1(studentGrades);
    // snip
}

And to be even more idiomatic in C++, you should not be using plain arrays in the first place.

Back to C, keep in mind that int *a and int a[] can sometimes be exchanged, but they are not the same thing.

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