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I have the following tables:

team_members

userid
teamid

users

uid
name_f
name_l

friends

friend_id
friend_one
friend_two

I use the following statement to select uid and profile_pic of the users that belong to a certain team.

SELECT DISTINCT u.uid, u.profile_pic
FROM friends f, users u, team_members m
WHERE m.teamid =$team_var
AND u.uid = m.userid

I also have to run the following to select the uid and profile_pic of the users who are friends with the logged-in user and belong to a certain team.

SELECT DISTINCT u.uid, u.profile_pic
FROM friends f, users u, team_members m
WHERE m.teamid =$team_var
AND u.uid = m.userid
AND m.userid = f.friend_two
AND f.friend_one =$session_id

I'm looking for a way to join these two and instead of running 2 queries, run one single query that can order and list the users who are friends with the logged-in user at the top. So let's say that a certain team has 30 users and 5 of those users are friends with the logged-in user, I would like to have the first 5 listed in the while loop following the statement to be those of the friends with the rest of the 25 randomly shown.

Thanks for your time.

share|improve this question
    
In your friends mapping table, do you have logical duplication for friend_one and friend_two such as { {x,y}, {y,x} } ? –  Tim Lehner Apr 2 '12 at 19:13
    
Yes, I do Tim. It goes as follows to record a friend connection (5 and 10 are userids): friend_one: 5 friend_two: 10 -- friend_one: 10 friend_two: 5 –  user1011713 Apr 2 '12 at 19:17
    
If anyone has any suggestions, please let me know...I'm very much stuck on this. –  user1011713 Apr 2 '12 at 20:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This can easily be solved with an outer join. You will probably not be able to use an outer join without the explicit join syntax. Here:

SELECT
  u.uid,
  u.profile_pic,
  (friend_id IS NOT NULL) AS is_friend
FROM team_members m
  INNER JOIN users u ON m.userid = u.uid
  LEFT JOIN friends f ON m.userid = f.friend_two AND f.friend_one = $session_id
WHERE m.teamid = $team_var
ORDER BY
  is_friend DESC,
  m.userid

The first two tables are joined using an inner join, so only the members of a specific team are returned (because we are filtering on teamid).

The friends table is outer-joined to the result of the previous join. More specifically, we a joining the subset of friends where friend_one is the current user. All rows from the previous result set are returned, but also rows from the friends's subset are returned where matched. Where not matched, the friends columns are filled with NULLs.

Using the NULL (or rather NOT NULL) test, we can see which team member is a friend and which isn't. The result of the test is returned as a column and also used as a sorting criterion for the output rows.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow. That did it. Thank you so much! –  user1011713 Apr 2 '12 at 21:20
    
What is the difference between inner join and join and what do you mean with outer join? I thought we only have left join or right join in mysql, not outer join. –  TMS Apr 2 '12 at 21:53
    
@Tomas: INNER JOIN and JOIN mean the same, the INNER keyword is optional. An outer join in MySQL is either of LEFT JOIN and RIGHT JOIN. Their complete names are LEFT OUTER JOIN and RIGHT OUTER JOIN, so, as you can see, OUTER is optional as well, but even without the OUTER word they are still outer joins. –  Andriy M Apr 3 '12 at 4:54

You would need to create another column which has a value of "friend" or not "friend". You would then use that column as an ORDER BY. The column you create could be a subquery to determine if the other user is a friend or not. The following code is wrong because you need to hook the data from the outer query into the subquery, but it should look something like:

SELECT DISTINCT u.uid, u.profile_pic,
EXISTS (SELECT DISTINCT u.uid, u.profile_pic 
FROM friends f, users u, team_members m 
WHERE m.teamid =$team_var 
AND u.uid = m.userid 
AND m.userid = f.friend_two 
AND f.friend_one =$session_id 
) AS myColumn 
FROM friends f, users u, team_members m 
WHERE m.teamid =$team_var 
AND u.uid = m.userid 
ORDER BY myColumn
share|improve this answer
    
For friend values, I have the friends table though. And that records friend_one with a userid and friend_two with the userid of the second user so it'd be redundant it seems to create another column for a friend's value. –  user1011713 Apr 2 '12 at 19:06

I might suggest this:

select u.uid, u.profile_pic
from team_members t
    join team_members m on t.teamid = m.teamid
    join users u on m.userid = u.uid
    left join friends f on t.userid = f.friend_one and m.userid = f.friend_two
where m.userid != t.userid
    and t.userid = $session_id -- This line can be removed to view all (test)
order by
    --t.teamid, t.userid, -- This line can be added to order all (test)
    (case when f.friend_id is null then 1 else 0 end case),
    f.friend_id, m.userid

I'm using explicit join syntax (which is normally recommended these days) and using that case statement in the order by to get friends to the top. I don't have MySQL running here to test it, but the syntax should be pretty standard (I'm running something very similar on SQL Server).

share|improve this answer
    
I see. Where would I play the team_variable in this case? –  user1011713 Apr 2 '12 at 21:02
    
It should be unnecessary, unless someone can be on more than one team. –  Tim Lehner Apr 2 '12 at 21:04
    
That's how it's setup right now. So for example, the user Bill can look at 10 teams and each team will have different members with his friends in each. –  user1011713 Apr 2 '12 at 21:06

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