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Here's two different ways that I could potentially do shift left by >= 64 bits with SSE intrinsics. The second variation treats the (shift == 64) case specially, and avoiding one SSE instruction, but adding the cost of an if check:

inline __m128i shiftLeftGte64ByBits( const __m128i & a, const unsigned shift )
{
   __m128i r ;

   r = _mm_slli_si128( a, 8 ) ; // a << 64

   r = _mm_sll_epi64( r, _mm_set_epi32( 0, 0, 0, shift - 64 ) ) ;

   return r ;
}

inline __m128i shiftLeftGte64ByBits( const __m128i & a, const unsigned shift )
{
   __m128i r ;

   r = _mm_slli_si128( a, 8 ) ; // a << 64

   if ( shift > 64 )
   {
      r = _mm_sll_epi64( r, _mm_set_epi32( 0, 0, 0, shift - 64 ) ) ;
   }

   return r ;
}

I was wondering (roughly) how the cost of this if() check compares with the cost of the shift instruction itself (perhaps relative to the time or number of cycles required for a normal ALU shift left instruction).

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3  
Have you profiled it? –  James McLaughlin Apr 2 '12 at 19:53
    
How about profiling? (Also, what platform and compiler? In GCC, you could influence branch prediction, in MSVC you can't AFAIK.) –  delnan Apr 2 '12 at 19:54
1  
This is will be very difficult to profile/benchmark. Mainly because the performance will be very sensitive to the branch-predictor. If your benchmark isn't "representative" of the actual data you will use, your numbers could be very misleading. –  Mysticial Apr 2 '12 at 19:57
1  
You're probably better off doing two shifts and using a conditional move to select the correct one. –  Mysticial Apr 2 '12 at 19:58
1  
I'm assuming this is related to your previous question. I'm saying that you can do two shifts (shift, and shift - 64). Then use a condition move to select the correct result. It'll probably still beat branching. –  Mysticial Apr 2 '12 at 20:01
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Answered with a microbenchmark, using code like:

void timingWithIf( volatile __m128i * pA, volatile unsigned long * pShift, unsigned long n )
{
   __m128i r = *pA ;

   for ( unsigned long i = 0 ; i < n ; i++ )
   {
      r = _mm_slli_si128( r, 8 ) ; // a << 64

      unsigned long shift = *pShift ;

      // does it hurt more to do the check, or just do the operation?
      if ( shift > 64 )
      {
         r = _mm_sll_epi64( r, _mm_set_epi32( 0, 0, 0, shift - 64 ) ) ;
      }
   }

   *pA = r ;
}

This generated the following code:

    xor    %eax,%eax
    movdqa (%rdi),%xmm0
    test   %rdx,%rdx
    movdqa %xmm0,0xffffffffffffffe8(%rsp)
    jbe    F0
    pxor   %xmm0,%xmm0
B0: movdqa 0xffffffffffffffe8(%rsp),%xmm2
    pslldq $0x8,%xmm2
    movdqa %xmm2,0xffffffffffffffe8(%rsp)
    mov    (%rsi),%rcx
    cmp    $0x40,%rcx
    jbe    F1
    add    $0xffffffffffffffc0,%rcx
    movd   %ecx,%xmm1
    punpckldq %xmm0,%xmm1
    punpcklqdq %xmm0,%xmm1
    psllq  %xmm1,%xmm2
    movdqa %xmm2,0xffffffffffffffe8(%rsp)
F1: inc    %rax
    cmp    %rdx,%rax
    jb     B0
F0: movdqa 0xffffffffffffffe8(%rsp),%xmm0
    movdqa %xmm0,(%rdi)
    retq
    nopl   0x0(%rax)

Observe that the shift that the branch avoids actually takes three SSE instructions (four if you could the ALU -> XMM reg move), plus one ALU add operation:

    add    $0xffffffffffffffc0,%rcx
    movd   %ecx,%xmm1
    punpckldq %xmm0,%xmm1
    punpcklqdq %xmm0,%xmm1
    psllq  %xmm1,%xmm2

With 1 billion loops I measure:

1) shift == 64:

~2.5s with the if (avoiding the no-op shift).

~2.8s executing the no-op shift.

2) with shift == 65:

~2.8s with or without the if.

Timings were made on "Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU X5570 @ 2.93GHz" (/proc/cpuinfo) and were relatively consistent.

Even when the branch is completely redundant (shift == 65) I don't see much difference in the time required to do the operation, but it definitely helps to avoid the instructions that would perform an SSE no-op shift left when (shift == 64).

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Looking at the generated code it's rather bizarre that the (intel compiler, -O2) compiler chooses to use stack spill and reload over and over again within the loop, when it's already got the values that it needs in registers. –  Peeter Joot Apr 2 '12 at 21:44
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