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It is possible to pass CSS selectors to the jQuery function such as:

jQuery('h1 + h2');

jQuery also has some filters such as :even and :odd:

jQuery('tr:even');

I was looking for some sort of syntax rule which differentiates the two and I was thinking that maybe the jQuery filters always use a :.

However, some CSS selectors also use a :. For example:

  • :last-child
  • :root
  • :empty
  • :target

Does anyone have any smart tips for knowing if it is a CSS selector or a jQuery filter being used?

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Not sure how any of the existing answers answers the question... –  BoltClock May 23 '12 at 2:15
    
@BoltClock are you sure you know what you are talking about? ... I am very confused... –  Neal May 31 '12 at 13:56
    
@Neal: I'm just as confused as you are. What are you answering "Yes" to? What are you saying should be possible in jQuery? –  BoltClock May 31 '12 at 14:00
    
I think the original question was (before a ninja edit, although I do not remember fully), was if those selectors were allowed with jQuery. So gdoron and I answered that question. –  Neal May 31 '12 at 14:02
    
@BoltClock it seems with the OPs ninja edit, gdoron's answer and mine make little sense.... –  Neal May 31 '12 at 14:06
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I was looking for some sort of syntax rule which differentiates the two and I was thinking that maybe the jQuery filters always use a :.

However, some CSS selectors also use a :.

Does anyone have any smart tips for knowing if it is a CSS selector or a jQuery filter being used?

This is one of the most annoying things about selector libraries adopting CSS syntax within their own extensions: because both match-based filters and true pseudo-classes are lumped together in an umbrella term known as "pseudo-selectors" (which basically means "selectors that begin with a :"), the only way to tell whether a "pseudo-selector" is a filter or a true simple selector is by knowing what it does, which if you're unfamiliar with the selector often means referring to the jQuery documentation as mentioned by others here. You'll notice that most of these match-based filters will have the word "match" somewhere in their descriptions; that is a reasonable indicator that a "pseudo-selector" works as a filter.

There is a subcategory of Selectors in jQuery called Basic Filters, however the name is completely misleading and the selectors themselves poorly categorized; not all of them are actual filters but some of them function like true pseudo-classes! At least the jQuery Extensions category has a proper name.

In fact, for the sake of easy reference, here is a list of jQuery selectors that work as match-based filters, and therefore are not true simple selectors by the definition in the Selectors spec:

These selectors take a set of matched elements and filter them, as opposed to other regular selectors which take an element and make deductions of what it is based solely on the information about the element, provided by the DOM or otherwise.

The :eq(), :gt(), :lt(), :even and :odd selectors are very often compared to :nth-child() and :nth-last-child(), as well as :first to :first-child and :last to :last-child. However, they are vastly different in terms of functionality. Be very careful in choosing which selector to use.

Also worth mentioning is the :not() selector; although I don't consider it as the same kind of filter as the above selectors, it's important to remember that jQuery extends it from what's actually offered in CSS. The differences are detailed in this question. I imagine that it's categorized under Basic Filters anyway because of .not(), which is most definitely for all its intents and purposes a filter method, and the antithesis of .filter().

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The idea of the jQuery selector utility function is to accept any css selector (including css3 selectors) and in addition to that add a few extra's which aren't defined in the css specification (examples of which are :odd (which in valid css is :nth-child(odd)) and :not(selector) for example). It is strongly advisable to not not use the jquery specific selectors except if really necessary as native css selectors can be processed (in modern webbrowsers) far quicker than custom jquery css. As gdoron already mentioned you can see the full list in the jquery documentation if you need to check whether a specific selector is or isn't available and you can find the custom selectors there as well.

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:odd is not the same as :nth-child(odd) - in fact, it has no CSS equivalent at all. For a detailed explanation of jQuery's :not() vs CSS3's :not(), see stackoverflow.com/questions/10711730/… –  BoltClock May 31 '12 at 13:48
    
My bad, I always use the :nth-child(odd) selector and forgot for a second that :odd doesn't work from the perspective of the parent. And yes, as far as :not, I was aware of that which is why I said that :not(selector) is a jquery extension (as :not(singleton selector) is the css alternative), but I didn't want to get into that too deeply as the question didn't seem to ask for that. –  David Mulder Jun 1 '12 at 11:32
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Yes, that selector exists in jQuery
The selector is called next adjacent selector

You can see the full selectors list here

Does anyone have any smart tips for knowing if it is a CSS selector or a JQuery filter being used?

My tip, check the API, if the selector exists or not...

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