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If I declare and object inside a for, and for example assign it's adress to a pointer, when that for ends, would that pointer be pointing to invalid memory? Like it happens at the end of a method with the objects that you declared in that method

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Give us a code example. –  Almo Apr 2 '12 at 20:53

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes, and not just inside for - inside any block.

For example:

 void bar()
 {
   foo* p;
   {
     foo f;
     p = &f;
   }
   // p no longer points to a valid object, f has ended its lifetime

Same thing with for except that the object will be created/destroyed each time the loop runs.

Now, if instead you have:

 void bar()
 {
   foo* p;
   {
     foo* f = new foo;
     p = f;
   }
   // p is still valid here, you need to clean up yourself with delete

And if you do that inside a for, you'll need to be very careful not to leak all those allocations.

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Ok thank you so much I'll accept your answer as soon as I can (4 minutes) –  XaitormanX Apr 2 '12 at 21:02

The variable will be on the stack and go out-of-scope when the for-loop completes. If you allocate memory on the heap, and assign it to a pointer declared in the for-loop, then the memory will have a dangling reference when the for-loop ends because the local reference no longer exists.

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Any object declared inside a { and } block is destructed upon exiting that block, regardless of the use of that block as part of a composite statement (e.g. a body of a for loop). All pointers to such objects become invalid as well.

EDIT as 0A0D correctly pointed out, the lifetime of objects created with new is controlled explicitly; they would survive exits from a block, but they also need to be deleted manually.

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except if you call new inside that block.. it should be deleted. –  user195488 Apr 2 '12 at 20:58
    
@0A0D you are right, my statement does not cover objects that are created dynamically. –  dasblinkenlight Apr 2 '12 at 20:59

Objects created on the stack (not using new/malloc/etc...) are destroyed at the end of the scope. So, yes.

Objects created on the heap (using new/malloc/etc...) are not, and you need to call delete/free/etc.. on them

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You mean:

for(init; condition; upd)
 {
     ThisIsAClass anObject;
     // do something, like even assigning the obj address to
     // a var declared outside the loop
 } 

 // here, the pointer to anObject can be used?

The answer is no. It (the object) "disappears" going out of scope.

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1  
when you see such a different variety of (all correct) answers, all upvoted and never downvoted, and yours is the only one (currently) downvoted (without explanation, of course), don't you think there's someone who targets you, not (only) because of the quality of the answer(s), but because it is you answering? It happens to me to think so. –  ShinTakezou Apr 3 '12 at 5:02

If you statically declare it, yes. If it's dynamic, then no.

For example, this will get freed

for (...)
{
   Foo f;
}

but this will not:

for (...)
{
    Foo * f = new Foo();
}
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Yes.

A for-statement has the following grammar:

for (init cond; expr) statement

And is equivalent to:

{
    init
    while (cond)
    {
        statement
        expr;
    }
}

So everything that was defined within the for-loop ends its lifetime at the conclusion of the loop, both for the inner expression and full control structure. Pointing to something that is no longer alive is UB.

In general:

void* p;

{
    T x;
    p = &x;
} // x no longer exists

// p no longer holds a valid value
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probably should clarify the meaning of everything because if it is new'd, then things are different.. see @Mat's answer. –  user195488 Apr 2 '12 at 21:00
    
@GManNickG Ok thanks,but they end it's lifetime at the end of each iteration of the loop or at the end of the general for? –  XaitormanX Apr 2 '12 at 21:00
    
@0A0D: They aren't different at all. Each object is destructed and its lifetime ended. Pointers just don't have ownership semantics. This has nothing to do with lifetime, that's a pointer thing. Of course things you new won't go away until they are delete'd. –  GManNickG Apr 2 '12 at 21:01
    
@XaitormanX: As you can see, both. expr is wrapped in { }, so everything in there will ends its lifetime as the iteration ends, while the entire loop is wrapped in { }, so everything outside the loop body but within the control structure will also end its lifetime as the full control loop ends. –  GManNickG Apr 2 '12 at 21:02
    
@GManNickG: Yes, that's what he's asking.. "does the memory get released after that for". foo *f = new foo() created dynamically in the loop is not released after the for-loop unless you do it manually. –  user195488 Apr 2 '12 at 21:03

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