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When I run the following code in the profiler, I get a char[] and byte[] that build up until the program crashes due to a java heap out of memory exception. Can someone tell me why? Perhaps I am doing something fundamentally wrong.

package testleak;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.sql.Connection;
import java.sql.DriverManager;
import java.sql.ResultSet;
import java.sql.SQLException;
import java.sql.Statement;
import java.util.Properties;
import javax.swing.Timer;

    public class TestLeak
    {
        static String DB_USERNAME = "userName";
        static String DB_SUBSCRIPTION_EXPIRATION = "subscriptionExpiration";
        static String DB_REMOTE_ACCESS_ENABLED = "remoteAccessEnabled";
        static String DB_LOCAL_USERNAME = "root";
        static String DB_LOCAL_PASS = "root";
        public static void main(String[] args)
        {
            Timer timer = new Timer(2000, new ActionListener()
            {
                @Override
                public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent evt)
                {
                    TestLeak tester = new TestLeak();
                    try
                    {
                       tester.go();
                    }
                    catch (NumberFormatException n)
                    {
                    }
                    tester = null;
                }
            });
            timer.start();
            while (true)
            {
                //keep the program from ending...
            }

        }
        private void go() throws NumberFormatException
        {
            ResultSet results = null;
            Connection conn = null;
            Properties connectionProps = new Properties();
            try
            {
                connectionProps.put("user", "root");
                connectionProps.put("password", "root");
                conn = DriverManager.getConnection("jdbc:mysql://localhost:8889/myDataBase",
                        connectionProps);
                connectionProps = null;
                try
                {
                    String rawQuery = new String("SELECT " + TestLeak.DB_USERNAME + ", "
                            + TestLeak.DB_REMOTE_ACCESS_ENABLED
                            + ", " + TestLeak.DB_SUBSCRIPTION_EXPIRATION + " FROM myTable");
                    Statement statement = conn.createStatement();
                    try
                    {
                        statement.executeQuery(rawQuery);
                        results = statement.getResultSet();
                        rawQuery = null;
                        try
                        {
                            while (results.next())
                            {
                                String auth = new String(results.getString(TestLeak.DB_REMOTE_ACCESS_ENABLED));
                                if (auth.equals("1"))
                                {
                                    Long subExpires = Long.valueOf(results.getString(TestLeak.DB_SUBSCRIPTION_EXPIRATION));
                                    if (subExpires > System.currentTimeMillis())
                                    {
                                        System.out.println(results.getString(TestLeak.DB_USERNAME));
                                        System.out.println();
                                    }
                                    subExpires = null;
                                }
                                auth = null;
                            }
                        }
                        finally
                        {
                            results.close();
                        }
                    }
                    finally
                    {
                        statement.close();
                    }
                }
                finally
                {
                    conn.close();
                }
            }
            catch (SQLException e)
            {
                System.out.println(e.getMessage());
            }
        }
    }

I think I am releasing everything, but something must be preventing all objects from being released. Why is it that all objects are not eligible for garbage collection when the go() method ends? Every time I envoke garbage collection in the profiler I get another surviving generation. Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
So ... put it in the debugger and figure out what's going wrong. –  Brian Roach Apr 2 '12 at 21:14
    
The SQLException catch block is outside the finally blocks that clean up JDBC resources. Are you getting any SQLExceptions? On a side note, there are methods for cleaning up JDBC resources without having to nest your try/catch/finally blocks like this.It would make the code much easier to read. –  rfeak Apr 2 '12 at 21:19
    
Make sure those .close are actually being called. Additionally, I thought those "close" statements needed to be in their own try-catch otherwise the first failure would cause the remaining to not execute? I believe in your case you should have a finally below your catch and handle the cleanup (of your ResultSet, Statement, and Connection) there. –  nevets1219 Apr 2 '12 at 21:19
1  
The while(true) is really a bad idea because it keeps your thread running. You should rather invoke wait() in a synchronized block –  Guillaume Polet Apr 2 '12 at 21:20
    
I am not getting any exceptions while running this. Could it be the while(true)?? Can someone give me a basic example of how I would run this by invoking wait() ? –  rob345 Apr 2 '12 at 22:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unfortunately you don't specify some details about the problem, for example, how big is the result set (# of rows), and how long does it take to run into out of memory exception.

I don't have access right now to the mysql driver you have, but I ran your same code with an H2 database, with 1000 rows in the myTable. The heap size of the JVM was stable during the test, without any memory leak. You can see that in the attached screenshot. The heap size increased a little, then returned to the original position after the GC, up again, down again, on a very stable pattern.

You can run your app and then run the Jvisualvm and connect to your app to see, for example, if the number of results from the database is too large to fit into the existing memory. Which is my guess. In this case the blue line will rapidly go over the max memory.

If that's the case you run your application with -Xmx setting to increase the memory size.

If indeed there is a memory leak it is not in your code, but in the driver you're using. To confirm a memory leak, the blue line in the chart below will go up (allocating memory), the GC will run (freeing up memory) but the blue line never gets back to it's original position leaving behind some objects.

JVisualVM Screenshot

share|improve this answer

I would change this:

                        statement.executeQuery(rawQuery);
                        results = statement.getResultSet();

to this:

                        results = statement.executeQuery(rawQuery);

The latter is certainly the API-approved way to do this, and while I can't say for certain that the former is a problem, it certainly seems like it could create two separate result-sets, of which you only close one.

share|improve this answer
    
getResultSet() returns the current ResultSet so I'm pretty sure that would not create two ResultSet. See docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/sql/Statement.html –  nevets1219 Apr 2 '12 at 21:22
1  
@nevets1219: That documentation says "This method should be called only once per result", and its see-also points to execute. So I think that calling executeQuery counts as calling execute plus calling getResultSet, such that calling executeQuery plus calling getResultSet would defy the API. –  ruakh Apr 2 '12 at 21:26
    
I just tried calling it multiple times and each time the same object was returned - it was also the same object that was returned from statement.executeQuery(...). Perhaps there's some other reason why it shouldn't be called multiple times? I still don't think it results in multiple ResultSet being created. –  nevets1219 Apr 2 '12 at 21:34
1  
@nevets1219: The reason that it shouldn't be called multiple times is that JDBC drivers are not required to handle that case in any particular way. So unless you have the same JDBC driver as the OP, your investigation is not meaningful. (To be sure: it seems quite likely that you do have the same JDBC driver as the OP. But I wouldn't just take that for granted.) –  ruakh Apr 2 '12 at 21:38
    
Thanks for that bit, I had forgotten about the JDBC drivers difference. I think I'll ask SO to see why you shouldn't call getResultSet more than once, I'm quite curious about that. Do you believe the undefined behavior to be the only reason? –  nevets1219 Apr 2 '12 at 21:47

I would suggest you try two things:

Extend your timer to about 10 seconds. Two is expecting a lot for a slow system.

Put a Thread.currentThread.sleep(10) (or similar) in your idle loop.

I expect you are not waiting for go to complete. While you are spinning on air in your idle loop the database connecion is dying from lack of cycles and every two seconds you add yet another connection and query. No wonder the poor thing is struggling.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that's the case. I took out the timer and just put the go() statement in the while(true) loop and I still get an ever growing char[] and byte[]. Curious though, the memory heap seems stable. –  rob345 Apr 2 '12 at 22:49
    
i am using the following driver: mysql-connector-java-5.1.11-bin.jar. Could this be the source of the problem? –  rob345 Apr 2 '12 at 23:01
    
If the memory heap seems stable then you are not leaking. –  OldCurmudgeon Apr 3 '12 at 9:34

Add the heap dump on out of memory arg and then look at the heap with mat or similar. Using HeapDumpOnOutOfMemoryError parameter for heap dump for JBoss

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