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Right now I'm doing as follow:

uint8_t ManualFlow = 40; // 0 -> 255     Unsigned Char

uint24_t ME; // 0 -> 16777215 Unsigned Short Long
ME = (uint24_t) ManualFlow*10; // Have to make this hack otherwise malfunction in calculation
ME /= 6;
ME *= (80 - 60);
ME /= 100;
ME *= 414;

The end result:

40*10 = 400
400/6 = 66
66*20 = 1320
1320/100 = 13
13*414 = 5382

What I would Love is similar to this:

4/60 = 0,0667 * 20 * 4188 * 0,998 = 5576 (more accurate).

How can I do this more accurate without using floats or doubles, and most important not increase my code size too much.

Kind Regards Sonite

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Because I have a uint24_t I think I'll just increase ManualFlow*10 to Manualflow*100. That will make it much more accurate. Largest values I can have are: "1000" * 10 / 6 * "100"/100 * 414 = 689724 –  Christian Apr 3 '12 at 9:12
    
You are wasting bits there... If you have a uint8_t and uint24_t, it means you can shift left the uint8_t by 16 bits. That's ~600 times more accurate than multiplying by 100 and, again, it's much faster, multiplication is very expensive, compared to bit shifts. –  Ștefan Apr 3 '12 at 10:18

6 Answers 6

You may want to look at fixed point arithmetic:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fixed-point_arithmetic

And Technical Report 18037 from WG14 (the last version ISO/IEC TR 18037:2008 is unfortunately not free):

http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg14/www/docs/n1169.pdf

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If you're certain that the result will never overflow, do all of your multiplication before the divisions:

uint24_t ME;
ME = (uint24_t)ManualFlow*10;
ME *= (80 - 60);
ME *= 414;
ME /= (6 * 14);

If you need more than integer accuracy but want to avoid floating-point, consider using fixed-point arithmetic instead.

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Ah... that's a close one. The largest value I could have here is then: 400 * (100) * 414 / (6*14) = 16560000. As u say, have to be certain that it wont overflow. I think I'll go after another approatch. –  Christian Apr 3 '12 at 9:06

You are referring to fixed-point arithmetic (as opposed to floating point). You can always increase the size of your integers to something like uint64_t and multiply by more than 10 to achieve the desired accuracy.

However, I would recommend using base-2 fixed point (i.e. shifting left by a certain number of bits as opposed to multiplying by 10 to a certain power). It's (much) faster and it can be more accurate.

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Multiply all your inputs by e.g. (1<<8) into bigger datatypes, then do the required maths, then divide the answer by (1<<8).

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

conclusion:

My initial code had not so good accuracy and was "this big".

By doing this below I increased the code with "38 byte" and gained better accuracy

ME = (uint24_t) ManualFlow*100;
ME /= 6;
ME *= (Port[2].AD - Port[3].AD);
ME /= 100;
ME *= 414;
ME /= 10;

The best accuracy I got by doing fixed-point but it increased the code to much "1148 bytes ->

// Utility macros for dealing with 16:16 fixed-point numbers
#define I2X(v) ((int32_t) ((v) * 65536.0 + 0.5))    // Int to Fix32
#define X2I(v) ((int16_t) ((v) + 0x8000 >> 16))     // Fix to Int

ME = I2X(ManualFlow*10); //400 * 65536.0 + 0.5 =   26214400
ME = I2X(ME/6); // 26214400 / 6 = 4369066
ME = I2X(ME * 20); // = 87381320
ME = I2X(ME / 100); // = 873813
ME = I2X(ME * 414); // 361758582
ME = X2I(ME); // 158FFF76 + 8000 >> 16 15907F76 >> 16 = 5520

Hope it can help some one else!

Kind Regards Sonite

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I may be a little late to answer for the original poster, but for posterity it should also be noted that fixed-point divisions can often also be avoided when speed is really critical on a small processor. Divisions by a variables are often unavoidable, but one can (almost) always use a multiply and a shift in place of a division by a constant, which can eat up many processor cycles, especially for types bigger than a small processor's data width. Instead of

uint16_t x = somevalue;  //somevalue known to be between 0 and 65535
x /= 107;

You can use:

uint32_t x = somevalue;
x *= 39199;  //chosen to be 2^n/107
             //n chosen to maximum value without exceeding 65536
x >>= 22;    //n = 22 in this case

Note: this is less readable code, but if this is an algorithm where performance is critical, this optimization can be used (sparingly).

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