Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We know that the android activity cycle has multiple phases.

between onStart() and onStop() is called the visible lifetime between onResume() and onPause() is called the foreground lifetime

What are the the key difference between them? Please give examples if possible.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers 2

If I display an Activity on the screen and the user is interacting with it, it is both in the foreground and visible.

If I start another Activity, which is transparent and shows a dialog box over the previous Activity, then the new Activity (the dialog box) is in the foreground and the old Activity is not in the foreground but still visible.

share|improve this answer
    
good answer, but I will wait more answers :) –  Bader Apr 2 '12 at 22:13
add comment

between onStart() and onStop() called visible lifetime that mean that the activity is visible either entire activity or partially visible and the user can see it on the screen and interacte with

between onResume() and onPause() called foreground lifetime that your activity is full visible and running and have full focus .

UPDATE

partially visible for example if another activity come in front of the current one and it only display a dialog and a transparent background . the user can see that activity but cant interact with it

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but what you mean in partially visible ? can you give me an exampple ? –  Bader Apr 2 '12 at 22:11
1  
partially visible for example if another activity come in front of the current one and it only display a dialog and a transparent background . the user can see that activity but cant interact with it –  confucius Apr 2 '12 at 22:13
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.