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This question covers when and why the typename and template disambiguators are needed in C++ template code.

Is it valid to use these disambiguators in cases where they are not needed in C++03? How about in C++11?

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That's entirely dependent on how strict your compiler is and how well it conforms to the standard. For example these keywords are more often needed for GCC than MSVC because Microsoft added a lot of extensions for C++ templates. –  AJG85 Apr 2 '12 at 22:23
    
@AJG85: I am curious about what the standard says, not so much about how various compilers approximate it. –  HighCommander4 Apr 3 '12 at 3:02
    
It's indeed a relaxed rule in C++03, based on feedback on the C++98 rules. You don't have to think as a compiler anymore. –  MSalters Apr 3 '12 at 7:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It's valid in conforming C++03/C++11 compilers, for some definition of "valid."

C++03 ISO/IEC 14882:2003 §14.2.5:

[ Note: just as is the case with the typename prefix, the template prefix is allowed in cases where it is not strictly necessary; i.e., when the expression on the left of the -> or ., or the nested-name-specifier is not dependent on a template-parameter. ]

C++11 ISO/IEC 14882:2011 §14.2.5:

[ Note: As is the case with the typename prefix, the template prefix is allowed in cases where it is not strictly necessary; i.e., when the nested-name-specifier or the expression on the left of the -> or . is not dependent on a template-parameter, or the use does not appear in the scope of a template. —end note ]

Note that you can't use template when the member in question isn't actually a template—you aren't allow to lie with it. Also note that for typename, the type has to be a qualified type (e.g. X::Y, not just X). C++11 also changed it so that you don't have to be in the scope of a template, whereas C++03 required you to be in a template. Also note that compilers are likely to differ on whether they actually let you do this. Under Clang, for instance, this warns under the flag -Wc++11-extensions.


Here are some examples, assuming the following definition:

struct X {
    typedef int Y;
    template <typename T> static void foo();
    static void bar();
    template <typename T> static void baz(T);
};

Invalid in both C++03 and C++11:

template <typename T>
void foo() {
    typename int z = 0; // int is not a qualified name.
    X::template bar();  // X::bar is not a template.
    X::template baz(z); // no template argument list.
}

Invalid in C++03, valid in C++11 (but produces a warning on my copy of Clang):

void bar() {
    typename X::Y z = 0;    // not in the body of a template, so
    X::template foo<int>(); // no possibility of dependent names.
}

Valid in both C++03 and C++11:

template <typename T>
void baz() {
    typename X::Y z = 0;    // not a dependent name, so 'typename'
    X::template foo<int>(); // isn't strictly necessary.
}
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"template" is not allowed before the name of a function template when there are no explicit template arguments given. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 3 '12 at 7:27
1  
    
@JohannesSchaub-litb That's what I get for just trusting Clang. Thanks for the catch. –  John Calsbeek Apr 3 '12 at 7:42

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