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Trying to re-size the shape matrix dynamically. This is part of a drawing program where _capacity is the number of shapes drawn on a frame.

Get the error in new Shape about _capacity saying expression needs to have a constant value.

void ShapeStore::Grow(int minimumCapacity)
{   
_capacity = max (minimumCapacity, 2 * _capacity);
if (_capacity)
    {

    Shape ***newData = new Shape[_frames][_capacity];   //figure out this 
    int i;

    for (int k = 0; k < _frames; k++)
        for (i=0;i<_count;i++)
            newData[k][i] = _data[k][i];

    delete [] _data;
    _data = newData;
    }  //*/
}
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3  
Why aren't you using std::vector? –  Mooing Duck Apr 2 '12 at 22:54
2  
Why not use a std::vector with size (num_rows * num_cols) and use an addressing scheme like data[col_index + (row_index * num_cols)]? Because Shape*** is just painful to look at. –  In silico Apr 2 '12 at 22:57
2  
*** in C++ is very wrong. –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 2 '12 at 23:09
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2 Answers 2

Shape ***newData = new Shape[_frames][_capacity];   //figure out this

This doesn't do what you think it does. It only allocates an array of pointers to arrays on the free store. Assuming that _capacity is a constant, each pointer in the array is a pointer to another fixed array which holds exactly _capacity instances of Shape. Here's a picture:

                index
            +-----------+
newData --> |     0     |  (pointer to a fixed array of _capacity instances of Shape)
            +-----------+
            |     1     |  (pointer to a fixed array of _capacity instances of Shape)
            +-----------+
            |     2     |  (pointer to a fixed array of _capacity instances of Shape)
            +-----------+
            |           |

               .......

            |           |
            +-----------+
            | _frames-1 |  (pointer to a fixed array of _capacity instances of Shape)
            +-----------+
(This is the only thing that is actually allocated)

The expression new Shape[_frames][_capacity] does not allocate enough memory to actually hold _frame*_capacity instances of Shape. Also, since each pointer in the array points to another array of fixed size, the compiler complains about the non-constant _capacity in your code snippet.

Instead of using the painfully confusing Shape*** and new[_frames][_capacity] business, use a std::vector to hold a linear array of Shapes, then use an addressing scheme to emulate rows and columns, like this:

// Exposition only

std::vector<Shape> data;

void ResizeMatrix(std::vector<Shape>& data, int frames, int capacity)
{
    data.resize(frames * capacity);
}

// Populate data with Shapes

void IndexMatrix(int capacity_index, int frame_index, int capacity)
{
    Shape& aShape = data[capacity_index + (capacity * frame_index)];
    // Do something with it
}
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thanks for the quick feedback. Tried using a vector earlier and since shape is an abstract class had an error saying that the abstract class could not be instantiated. Will give them another look. Thanks! –  user1309174 Apr 3 '12 at 0:12
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When accessing contents of newData, it's not newData[k][i] but rather (*newData)[k][i]

newData is not a two-dimensional array, it's a pointer to a two-dimensional array. Rule of thumb is each * at the time of declaration should be matched by one *, ->, or [] in use.

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