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I am trying to port some code to GCC, that compiles OK with the IAR compiler. The code initialises an array of C++ objects (a struct with an array of chars). I can get it to work with GCC in C, but not with C++. Here is a simple example.

#include  <stdio.h>

typedef struct
{
 int lineID[10];
} TMenu;

static const TMenu t1[8] =
{
    {{3}},
    {{4}},
    [6] = {{33, 22}},
    [8] = {{33, 22}},
    {{}},
    {{9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1}},
};

NOTE: I also had to add extra curly brackets around the initializers, which IAR didn't complain about.

It compiles fine with GCC, but when compiled with G++ I get the following errors.

x.c:12:6: error: expected identifier before numeric constant
x.c: In lambda function:
x.c:12:9: error: expected '{' before '=' token
x.c: At global scope:
x.c:12:20: error: no match for 'operator=' in '._2 = {{33, 22}}'
x.c:13:6: error: expected identifier before numeric constant
x.c: In lambda function:
x.c:13:9: error: expected '{' before '=' token
x.c: At global scope:
x.c:13:20: error: no match for 'operator=' in '._3 = {{33, 22}}'
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4  
It's quite simple really. This is not C++, this syntax is not part of the standard. –  Cat Plus Plus Apr 3 '12 at 3:27
    
I'm not up on my C99, but those look like designated initializers, which are not a part of C++ (and not provided as an extension either in g++). –  Jesse Good Apr 3 '12 at 3:39
    
Note: using g++ 4.5.3 (on OS X). I was using g++ 4.2.1 (standard on OS X 10.7) but that gave me really weird errors. I'm currently installing g++ 4.6 and 4.7 to see if that makes any difference. –  BrendanSimon Apr 3 '12 at 3:48
    
I figured it wasn't part of C++, but since C handles it OK, and the IAR compiler handles it OK, I thought G++ might be able to handle it too. IAR is set to Extended Embedded C++ standard so I presume it is using that, unless it is falling back to C ?? –  BrendanSimon Apr 3 '12 at 3:51
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2 Answers

Looks like GCC 4.7 is getting closer to supporting this construct. Here is the output of GCC 4.5, 4.6 and 4.7 when compiling the same example.

GCC 4.5.3

$ /opt/local/bin/g++-mp-4.5 -Wall -std=c++0x -o y.exe x.c
x.c:12:6: error: expected identifier before numeric constant
x.c: In lambda function:
x.c:12:9: error: expected '{' before '=' token
x.c: At global scope:
x.c:12:20: error: no match for 'operator=' in '._2 = {{33, 22}}'
x.c:13:6: error: expected identifier before numeric constant
x.c: In lambda function:
x.c:13:9: error: expected '{' before '=' token
x.c: At global scope:
x.c:13:20: error: no match for 'operator=' in '._3 = {{33, 22}}'

GCC 4.6.3

$ /opt/local/bin/g++-mp-4.6 -Wall -std=c++0x -o y.exe x.c
x.c:12:6: error: expected identifier before numeric constant
x.c: In lambda function:
x.c:12:9: error: expected '{' before '=' token
x.c: At global scope:
x.c:12:20: error: no match for 'operator=' in '{} = {{33, 22}}'
x.c:12:20: note: candidate is:
x.c:12:7: note: <lambda()>&<lambda()>::operator=(const<lambda()>&) <deleted>
x.c:12:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from '<brace-enclosed initializer list>' to 'const<lambda()>&'
x.c:13:6: error: expected identifier before numeric constant
x.c: In lambda function:
x.c:13:9: error: expected '{' before '=' token
x.c: At global scope:
x.c:13:20: error: no match for 'operator=' in '{} = {{33, 22}}'
x.c:13:20: note: candidate is:
x.c:13:7: note: <lambda()>&<lambda()>::operator=(const<lambda()>&) <deleted>
x.c:13:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from '<brace-enclosed initializer list>' to 'const<lambda()>&'

GCC 4.7.0

$ /opt/local/bin/g++-mp-4.7 -Wall -std=c++0x -o y.exe x.c
x.c:16:1: sorry, unimplemented: non-trivial designated initializers not supported
x.c:16:1: sorry, unimplemented: non-trivial designated initializers not supported
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Just tried clang-3.0 and it succeeded in building and executing correctly :) So it looks like G++ is behind the times somewhat, even if it isn't in the C++ spec, it seems a worthwhile feature that clang and IAR compilers support this construct. Note that the IAR C++ compiler is from 2008 !! –  BrendanSimon Apr 3 '12 at 12:45
    
I believe clang supports designated initializers as an extension it should give you warning if you compile with -pendantic. –  Jesse Good Apr 3 '12 at 23:30
    
Didn't seem to produce any warning messages, other than ... clang: warning: argument unused during compilation: '-pendantic' –  BrendanSimon Apr 4 '12 at 3:04
    
My mistake. I misspelled (misspelt) pedantic. Indeed I do get a warning: x.cpp:12:5: warning: designated initializers are a C99 feature, accepted in C++ as an extension [-pedantic] –  BrendanSimon Apr 8 '12 at 12:14
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I've never seen syntax like

[6] = {33, 22}},

in C++. You could try just using empty initializers to fill the gaps. The following works on www.ideone.com (http://ideone.com/8I6oC):

#include <iostream>

struct TMenu
{
  int lineID[10];
};

int main(int, char*[])
{
  const TMenu t1[8] =
  {
    {{3}},
    {{4}},
    {{33, 22}},
    {{33, 22}},
    {{}},
    {{9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1}},
  };
  for (int i = 0; i < 8; ++i)
  {
    for (int j = 0; j < 10; ++j)
    {
      std::cout << t1[i].lineID[j] << "\t";
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;
  }
}
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Yep, but in the real code the designators are symbolic constants (macros) used throughout the code. There are nearly 60 of them. The use of designators allows the code to be more robust be ensuring that index constants will always be correct. It's strange that using C++ would give you less robust code. –  BrendanSimon Apr 3 '12 at 4:00
    
The example code was a simple test case. Real code would have something like: [MenuSignOn] = {{1, 2, 3, 4}}, [MenuSetup] = {{28,27,29,30}}, etc. To be honest I think this module needs to be rewritten, but my initial goal was to just port what I had inherited. –  BrendanSimon Apr 3 '12 at 9:49
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