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My title sums this up pretty well. My first though it to provide a few data formats, one being HTML, which I can provide and consume using the Razor view engine and MVC3 controller actions respectively. Then, maybe provide other data formats through custom view engines. I have never really worked in this area before except for very basic web services, very long ago. What are my options here? What is this Web API I see linked to MVC4?

NOTE: My main HTML app need not operate directly off the API. I would like to write the API first, driven by the requirements of a skeleton HTML client, with a very rudimentary UI, and once the API is bedded down, then write a fully featured UI client using the same services as the API but bypassing the actual data parsing and presentation API components.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+200

I had this very same thought as soon as the first talk of the Web API was around. In short, the Web API is a new product from the MS .NET Web Stack that builds on top of WCF, OData and MVC to provide a uniform means of creating a RESTful Web API. Plenty of resources on that, so go have a Google.

Now onto the question..

The problem is that you can of course make the Web API return HTML, JSON, XML, etc - but the missing piece here is the Views/templating provided by the Razor/ASPX/insertviewenginehere. That's not really the job of an "API".

You could of course write client-side code to call into your Web API and perform the templating/UI client-side with the mass amount of plugins available.

I'm pretty sure the Web API isn't capable of returning templated HTML in the same way an ASP.NET MVC web application can.

So if you want to "re-use" certain portions of your application (repository, domain, etc), it would probably be best to wrap the calls in a facade/service layer of sorts and make both your Web API and seperate ASP.NET MVC web application call into that to reduce code.

All you should end up with is an ASP.NET MVC web application which calls into your domain and builds templated HTML, and an ASP.NET Web API application which calls into your domain and returns various resources (JSON, XML, etc).

If you have a well structured application then this form of abstraction shouldn't be a problem.

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2  
Nice thoughts. Maybe I could look toward an MVC web application on top of a solid service layer as a start, with alternate view engines for handling the other data formats. –  ProfK Apr 3 '12 at 5:56

I'd suggest developing your application in such a way that you use a single controller to return the initial application assets (html, javascript, etc) to the browser. Create your API / logic in WebAPI endpoint services and access those services via JavaScript. Essentially creating a single page application. Using MVC 4 our controller can return different Views depending on the device (phone, desktop, tablet), but using the same JavaScript all of your clients will be able to access the service.

Good libraries to look into include KnockoutJS, SammyJS , or BackBoneJS

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If you do have a requirement to return HTML using the WebAPI e.g. to allow users to click around and explore your API using the same URL then you can use routing\an html message handler.

public class HtmlMessageHandler : DelegatingHandler
{
    private List<string> contentTypes = new List<string> { "text/html", "application/html", "application/xhtml+xml" };

    protected override Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {                                
        if (request.Method == HttpMethod.Get && request.Headers.Accept.Any(h => contentTypes.Contains(h.ToString())))
        {
            var response = new HttpResponseMessage(HttpStatusCode.Redirect);

            var htmlUri = new Uri(String.Format("{0}/html", request.RequestUri.AbsoluteUri));
            response.Headers.Location = htmlUri;

            return Task.Factory.StartNew<HttpResponseMessage>(() => response);
        }
        else
        {
            return base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken);
        }
    }
}    

For a full example check out:- https://github.com/arble/WebApiContrib.MessageHandlers.Html

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I've played with this idea before. I exposed an API through MVC3 as JSONResult methods on different controllers. I implemented custom security for the API using controller action filters. Then built a very AJAX heavy HTML front-end which consumed the JSON services. It worked quite well and had great performance, as all data transferred for the web app was through AJAX.

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I likes me some heavy AJAX. I'll have a look. –  ProfK Apr 8 '12 at 5:35

Here's a must read on MVC and Web API - With HTTP, your application is your API.

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Frederik Normen has a good post on Using Razor together with ASP.NET Web API: http://weblogs.asp.net/fredriknormen/archive/2012/06/28/using-razor-together-with-asp-net-web-api.aspx

One important constraint of a well designed REST service is utilizing "hypermedia as the engine of application state" (HATEOAS - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HATEOAS).

It seems to me that HTML is an excellent choice to support as one of the media formats. This would allow developers and other users to browse and interact with your service without a specially built client. Which in turn would probably result in the faster development of a client to your service. (When it comes to developing actual HTML clients it would make more sense to use a json or xml.) It would also force a development team into a better designed rest service as you will be forced to structure your representations in such a way that facilitates an end users navigation using a browser.

I think it would be smart for any development team to consider taking a similar approach to Frederik's example and create a media type formatter that generates an HTML UI for a rest service based on reflecting on the return type and using conventions (or something similar - given the reflection I would make sure the html media format was only used for exploration by developers. Maybe you only make it accessible in certain environments.).

I'm pretty sure I'll end up doing something like this (if someone hasn't already or if there is not some other feature in the web api that does this. I'm a little new to Web API). Maybe it'll be my first NuGet package. :) If so I'll post back here when it's done.

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Nice ideas here, thanks @Stewart. –  ProfK Jul 5 '12 at 7:15

Have you seen this video? Might want to download it before watching, so it doesn't skip around.

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Creating Html is a job for an Mvc Controller not for Web Api, so if you need something that is able to return both jSon and Html generated with some view engine the best option is a standard Mvc Controller Action methosd. Content Negotiation, that is the format to return, can be achieved with an Action Fiter. I have an action filter that enable the the controller to receive "hints" from the client on the format to return. The client can ask to return a view with a specific name, or jSon. The hint is sent either in the query string or in an hidden field (in case the request comes from a form submit). The code is below:

public class AcceptViewHintAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    private JsonRequestBehavior jsBehavior;
    public AcceptViewHintAttribute(JsonRequestBehavior jsBehavior = JsonRequestBehavior.DenyGet)
    {
        this.jsBehavior = jsBehavior;
    }
    public override void OnActionExecuted(ActionExecutedContext filterContext)
    {
        string hint = filterContext.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.Params["ViewHint"];
        if (hint == null) hint = filterContext.RequestContext.RouteData.Values["ViewHint"] as string;
        if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(hint) && hint.Length<=100 && new Regex(@"^\w+$").IsMatch(hint) )
        {


                ViewResultBase res = filterContext.Result as ViewResultBase;
                if (res != null)
                {
                    if (hint == "json")
                    {
                        JsonResult jr = new JsonResult();
                        jr.Data = res.ViewData.Model;
                        jr.JsonRequestBehavior = jsBehavior;
                        filterContext.Result = jr;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        res.ViewName = hint;
                    }
                }

        }
        base.OnActionExecuted(filterContext);
    }
}
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Now that it's been a little while through the Beta, MS just released the Release Candidate version of MVC4/VS2012/etc. Speaking to the navigation/help pages (mentioned by some other posters), they've added a new IApiExplorer class. I was able to put together a self-documenting help page that picks up all of my ApiControllers automatically and uses the comments I've already put inline to document them.

My recommendation, architecture-wise, as others have said as well, would be to abstract your application into something like "MVCS" (Model, View, Controller, Services), which you may know as something else. What I did was separate my models into a separate class library, then separated my services into another library. From there, I use dependency injection with Ninject/Ninject MVC3 to hook my implementations up as needed, and simply use the interfaces to grab the data I need. Once I have my data (which is of course represented by my models), I do whatever is needed to adjust it for presentation, and send it back to the client.

Coming from MVC3, I have one project that I ported to MVC4, which uses the "traditional" Razor markup and such, and a new project that will be a single page AJAX application using Backbone + Marionette and some other things sprinkled in. So far, the experience has been really great, it's super easy to use. I found some good tutorials on Backbone + Marionette here, although they can be a bit convoluted, and require a bit of digging through documentation to put it all together, it's easy once you get the hang of it:

Basic intro to Backbone.js: http://arturadib.com/hello-backbonejs/docs/1.html

Use cases for Marionette views (I found this useful when deciding how to create views for my complex models): https://github.com/derickbailey/backbone.marionette/wiki/Use-cases-for-the-different-views

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