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I have scenario where I have to use the same XSD element for different purpose so that my resulting XML can contain either one or more p tags but not all.

   <p>some paragraph here </p>

    <p> 
        <img src = "....."   alt="......"/>
    </p>

    <p> <b> some text here <b> <p> 

     <p> ...... <g1> ........ <g2>.......<g3>........<p>

I am new to XML Schema, Thanks in advance.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

The assumption I am making is that you're trying to define the p tag, by showing its different content models. The first thing is that by taking in text, you have to define its content as mixed. From there, you could use a repeating choice that lists all other elements, such as img, b, g1, g2, etc.

I am showing an excerpt from the XHTML XSD:

  <xs:element name="p">
    <xs:complexType mixed="true">
      <xs:complexContent>
        <xs:extension base="Inline">
          <xs:attributeGroup ref="attrs" />
        </xs:extension>
      </xs:complexContent>
    </xs:complexType>
  </xs:element>

  <xs:complexType name="Inline" mixed="true">
    <xs:annotation>
      <xs:documentation>
      "Inline" covers inline or "text-level" elements
      </xs:documentation>
    </xs:annotation>
    <xs:choice minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="unbounded">
      <xs:group ref="inline" />
      <xs:group ref="misc.inline" />
    </xs:choice>
  </xs:complexType>

etc.

A good learning might be to look at the XTHML XSD. You could use an XSD editor to investigate the structures associated with the p tag.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I was looking for! Thank you. – Harini Natarajan Apr 5 '12 at 6:05

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