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 rdict = {}
    f = open(filename)
    for line in f: 
        d = line.split()
        name = d[0]
        rating = int(d[2])
        if name in rdict:
            pass
        else: 
            zlist = []
            for i in range[150]:
                rdict[name] = #a list of ratings

I would like to add values (from data given outside of this!) to rdict from the range 150. What would I set rdict equal to?

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closed as not a real question by jdi, casperOne Apr 11 '12 at 14:30

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I dont understand this. What is the intention of for i in range[150]:? –  jdi Apr 3 '12 at 6:07
    
I don't understand this. You we set rdict[name] equal to "a list of ratings" however you generate that. Also, range[150] should probably be range(150) –  aaronasterling Apr 3 '12 at 6:07
    
This question is not very clear. What is the entry in rdict supposed to represent in the case when the name is not in rdict ? what is zlist, and what is the significance of 150? –  Preet Kukreti Apr 3 '12 at 6:08
    
@aaronasterling: And even if thats right, it should even be xrange(150) –  jdi Apr 3 '12 at 6:08
1  
@aaronasterling: Dont be too hard on yourself. Its not like this question even makes any sense anyways. –  jdi Apr 3 '12 at 6:14

2 Answers 2

I have two guesses at the shape of your data based on the clues you have so graciously provided:

  1. The data is something like a file with many rows containing a name in the first column (column 0) and the rating for that name in the 3rd column (column 2). In this scenario I'm guessing that each name has been rated 150 times and therefore each name that appears in the file will appear exactly 150 times. In this this scenario I replaced your dictionary with a defaultdict whose factory parameter is list which means that the value for each name will default to an empty list and then for each line we process we just add the rating to the list.

    from collections import defaultdict
    
    rdict = defaultdict(list)
    f = open(filename)
    for line in f: 
       d = line.split()
       name = d[0]
       rating = int(d[2])
       rdict[name].append(rating)
    
  2. Perhaps you have more of a columnar type of file with 150 ratings per row, in which case the following code is probably closer to what you are looking for:

    from collections import defaultdict
    
    FIRST_RATING_COL=1
    rdict = {}
    f = open(filename)
    for line in f:
        d = line.split()
        name = d[0]
        string_ratings = d[FIRST_RATING_COL:]
        int_ratings = map(int, string_ratings)
        rdict[name] = int_ratings
    

    In this second scenario since the ratings are available all at once, we can stick with the original dictionary and we simply extract the right set of columns into a list then turn the entire list into integers in one shot then assign the resulting list to the appropriate name in rdict. You may need to play with the value of FIRST_RATING_COL to find the proper starting spot depending on how exactly the file is laid out.

If neither of these is correct then I suspect providing an example of your data or more information about it's shape would help people provide more helpful answers.

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I'm giving you a +1 for possibly cracking the OPs code. Also, if the OP doesn't need duplicate ratings, you could use a set in the defaultdict for more efficiency. But again, who knows what the OP wants. –  jdi Apr 3 '12 at 6:26
    
Also, thanks for consolidating your answers. I think you will end up with more votes this way. Good work. –  jdi Apr 3 '12 at 6:54

If you're trying to associate every "name" with a list of values then the code below might be it.

rdict = {}
f = open("filename")
for line in f: 
    d = line.split()
    name = d[0]
    rating = int(d[2])
    if name in rdict:
        pass
    else: 
        zlist = []
        for i in range(150):
            zlist.append("V" + str(i) )
        rdict[name] = zlist
print(rdict)
share|improve this answer
    
Why are you generating the same zlist every time its adding a new name? I'm not sure I understand what this solution is achieving? –  jdi Apr 3 '12 at 6:52
    
@jdi the code does nothing. I don't know what data he wants to associate so I made a dummy list of items to associate. Hope that helps. –  Nishant Sharma Apr 5 '12 at 10:39
    
Im not trying to be mean or rude. But no unfortunately that does not help. This answer doesn't do anything and is about as confusing as his original question. There really isnt a point in posting an obscure answer in an attempt at making an extremely vague guess. Just my opinion here. –  jdi Apr 5 '12 at 14:19

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