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I've got an application that reads all the files and sub folders within the built assembly directory and display it using a datagridview. But I when try to run the application in my network drive to try scanning the files within that drive, it gives out the exception "Access to path 'F:/System File Volume' is denied" and then the application will stop running. Any idea on how to get pass the System File Volume, and still display those files which can be access. Here is my code if needed :

        private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

        count = 0;
        timer = new Timer();
        timer.Interval = 1000;
        timer.Tick += new EventHandler(timer1_Tick);
        timer.Start();
        //FileIOPermission permit;

        try
        {   
            s1 = Directory.GetFiles(Path.GetDirectoryName(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location), "*.*", SearchOption.AllDirectories);
            //permit = new FileIOPermission(FileIOPermissionAccess.AllAccess, s1);
            //permit.AddPathList(FileIOPermissionAccess.AllAccess, s1);
            for (int i = 0; i <= s1.Length - 1; i++)
            {
                if (i == 0)
                {
                    dt.Columns.Add("File_Name");
                    dt.Columns.Add("File_Type");
                    dt.Columns.Add("File_Size");
                    dt.Columns.Add("Create_Date");
                }


                FileInfo info = new FileInfo(s1[i]);
                FileSystemInfo sysInfo = new FileInfo(s1[i]);
                dr = dt.NewRow();

                dr["File_Name"] = sysInfo.Name;
                dr["File_Type"] = sysInfo.Extension;
                dr["File_Size"] = (info.Length / 1024).ToString();
                dr["Create_Date"] = sysInfo.CreationTime.Date.ToString("dd/MM/yyyy");
                dt.Rows.Add(dr);


                if ((info.Length / 1024) > 1500000)
                {
                    MessageBox.Show("" + sysInfo.Name + " had reach its size limit.");
                }
            }

            if (dt.Rows.Count > 0)
            {
                dataGridView1.DataSource = dt;
            }
        }

        catch (UnauthorizedAccessException ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("Error : " + ex.Message);
            throw;
        }

    }

    private bool IsIgnorable(string dir)
    {
        if (dir.EndsWith(":System Volume Information")) return true;
        if (dir.Contains(":$RECYCLE.BIN")) return true;
        return false;
    }

    private void timer1_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
            count++;
            if (count == 60)
            {
                count = 0;
                timer.Stop();
                Application.Restart();
            }
    }

    public string secondsToTime(int seconds)
    {
         int minutes = 0;
         int hours = 0;

         while (seconds >= 60)
         {
            minutes += 1;
            seconds -= 60;
         }
         while (minutes >= 60)
         {
            hours += 1;
            minutes -= 60;
         }

         string strHours = hours.ToString();
         string strMinutes = minutes.ToString();
         string strSeconds = seconds.ToString();

         if (strHours.Length < 2)
             strHours = "0" + strHours;
         if (strMinutes.Length < 2)
             strMinutes = "0" + strMinutes;
         if (strSeconds.Length < 2)
             strSeconds = "0" + strSeconds;
         return strHours + ":" + strMinutes + ":" + strSeconds;
     }

    private void textBox1_TextChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        BindingSource bind = new BindingSource();
        bind.DataSource = dt;
        bind.Filter = string.Format("File_Name like '%{0}%'", textBox1.Text.Trim());
    }
share|improve this question
    
That directory contains restore points, not even an admin has access to it. This stops you from using SearchOption.AllDirectories from the root. Not that it is safe to use it from a non-root path either, hitting an inaccessible file is always possible.. You'll have to iterate it yourself, using recursion, so you can catch exceptions. Skip any directory that's hidden or system to avoid most exceptions. –  Hans Passant Apr 3 '12 at 19:58

1 Answer 1

You will have to create a try/catch block inside of your for loop and deal with the error for each file on its own, then you can continue the loop afterwards.

I would suggest making a function out of it, Here is some "air code", untested, probably syntactic wrong, but I think you get the idea:

bool GetFileInformation(File f, out string name)
{
    name=null;
    try
    {
       FileInfo info = new FileInfo(f);
       FileSystemInfo sysInfo = new FileSystemInfo(f);
       name=sysInfo.Name;
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

Now you can easily build the loop around this:

 for (int i = 0; i <= s1.Length - 1; i++)
 {
     if (GetFileInformation(s1[i], out name)
     {
        dr = dt.NewRow();
        dr["File_Name"] = name;
        // ....

     }
  } 
share|improve this answer
    
I see. Theoretically I understand the concept. Meaning I have to read each file separately individually then those who cannot be access, just skip it right?? But how do I check whether the file is accessible or not??Is there any function for it?? Sorry but I'm quite new at programming especially in c# environment. –  M.Heart Apr 3 '12 at 6:45
    
@shahrul1509: if you try to access the file via FileInfo and your code throws an exception, this shows you that the file is not accessible. It may be a good idea to refactor the part using the FileInfo into a separate method. –  Doc Brown Apr 3 '12 at 6:51
    
What do you mean by putting it in a different method?Is there any difference if I put it in a different method?? –  M.Heart Apr 3 '12 at 7:06
    
@shahrul1509: see my edit –  Doc Brown Apr 3 '12 at 19:29
1  
Please don't catch Exception. Check which exception you're getting, and catch that. You really shouldn't try to continue if you get, for example, an unexpected OutOfMemoryException instead of the IOException you're trying to handle. –  hvd Apr 3 '12 at 19:47

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