Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a data like this. Is there any way to smoothen my plot ?

cr <- colorRampPalette(col=c("red", "red", "red", "red"), bias=1)
linecols <- cr(3)
x<-c(-1000.000000,-900.000000,-800.000000,-700.000000,-600.000000,-500.000000,-400.000000,-300.000000,-200.000000,-100.000000,0.000000,100.000000,200.000000,300.000000,400.000000,500.000000,600.000000,700.000000,800.000000,900.000000,1000.000000)
y<-c(0.809524,1.000000,1.333333,1.333333,3.285714,7.761905,13.619048,7.571429,14.809524,3.904762,1.857143,2.285714,4.857143,8.571429,2.000000,1.523810,2.714286,0.857143,1.285714,0.857143,1.380952)
plot(x, y,type="l",main="Average",ylab="Average Profile",col=linecols[1],ylim=c(0.809524,14.809524),xaxt="s",yaxt="s",lwd=2)
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

lines(x, smooth(y))

See ?smooth.

lines(supsmu(x, y))

See '?supsmu'.

Beware, smoothing is the devil's business.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems excel smoothing is different from ggplot or R smoothing. Excel doesn't change any shape but R/ggplot does. –  bogu Apr 9 '12 at 3:33
2  
What algorithm/s does Excel use? There is really no end to what you might do for this. You should provide an example, if you think this is an issue. –  mdsumner Apr 9 '12 at 4:40

I'll second @mdsumner 's caution about smoothing (an internet search of "smoothing data bad" returns lots of pages), but I'll offer another solution:

plot(lowess(x,y,f=1/3),type="l",col="red")

See ?lowess for more information.

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Many smoothers are available.

Here is a smoothing function:

trace.smooth<-function(trace, type="Savitsky-Golay", width=10){

  if(type=="lowess"){
    smooth.trace<-with(clean.trace, lowess(x=1:length(trace),
                                   y=trace,
                                   f=width/length(trace),
                                   delta=width/2))$y
  }

  if(type=="moving-average"){
        moving_average<-function(width=10){
        moving.average<-rep(1,width)/width
        return(moving.average)
      }

      moving.average<-moving_average(width)

      smooth.trace<-filter(trace, moving.average)

  }

  if(type=="Savitsky-Golay"){
      # Savitsky-Golay smoothing function 
    savistsky_golay<-function(width=10){
      x<-1:width-width/2
      y<-max(x^2)-x^2
      sg<-y/sum(y)
      return(sg)
    }

    sg<-savistsky_golay(width)

      smooth.trace<-filter(trace, sg)
  }

  return(smooth.trace)
}

A solution using ggplot2

library(ggplot2)

df<-data.frame(x=x, y=y)

qplot(data=df,
      x=x,
      y=y,
      geom=c("line", "point"))+
      geom_smooth(se=F)

plot with smooth

you can add a method argument to geom_smooth(method="loess")

method: smoothing method (function) to use, eg. lm, glm, gam, loess, rlm

you can fine tune using stat_smooth

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.