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Is this possible?

What I want to do is have my doWork method instantiate another class and then call its start method. Then i would like to report progress from that class back to the ProgressChanged handler in the parent class. I've tried passing a reference to the BackgroundWorker but i get an error.

private void ComplianceWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        ComplianceControlCenter CCC = 
         new ComplianceControlCenter(taskList.CheckedItems.OfType<string>().ToList(),
                                     file_box.Text, &ComplianceWorker);
        CCC.start();
    }

EDIT:

There is only 1 background worker. I would like to pass it by reference to the constructor of ComplianceControlCenter so i can send progress updates to it from inside that class. The reasoning is the class do some fairly complicated work and i need to have a division. So again, i would like to pass the background worker from the doWork method to the CCC object so i can call ComplianceWorker.ReportProgress();

Error 1 Cannot take the address of, get the size of, or declare a pointer to a managed type ('System.ComponentModel.BackgroundWorker')

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3  
Then post the error details. I guess it has to do with the & in &ComplianceWorker but I'd like to know for sure. –  Henk Holterman Apr 3 '12 at 7:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could do that, although I don't see what purpose it would serve for simple cases. Since you are already inside the business method of a BackgroundWorker there's no point in using yet more threads by creating another BackgroundWorker and you could do the same work inline.

If you still want to have a second BackgroundWorker, you can propagate progress changed events from the second worker to the first by attaching a handler to the second worker's ProgressChanged event. This handler would then raise the ProgressChanged event on the first worker, propagating the news.

For example:

private void ComplianceWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    var CCC = new ComplianceControlCenter(/* ... */);

    // Assume that CCC exposes a BackgroundWorker, but read below
    var worker = CCC.Worker; // "second" worker
    worker.ProgressChanged += this.PropagateProgressChanged;

    CCC.start();
}

private void PropagateProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
{
    var worker = this.worker; // "first" worker
    worker.ReportProgress(e.ProgressPercentage, e.UserState);
}

This code attaches an event handler to the "second" worker with

var worker = CCC.Worker; // "second" worker
worker.ProgressChanged += this.PropagateProgressChanged;

which assumes that ComplianceControlCenter exposes its own BackgroundWorker directly. Since that may not be the case, you can turn the relationship around by passing a reference to this.PropagateProgressChanged to the constructor instead and letting it attach the event handler for you.

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I only want 1 background worker. –  Chris Rice Apr 3 '12 at 16:35

if both the background workers are the same, you will run to an infinite loop. possibly, create two different backgroundworkers. if you require some thing similar between them, create a base class/interface.

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I think the OP just wants to pass a reference. –  Henk Holterman Apr 3 '12 at 7:16

In C#, references are passed like this:

ComplianceControlCenter CCC = new ComplianceControlCenter(..., ComplianceWorker);

not like this

ComplianceControlCenter CCC = new ComplianceControlCenter(..., &ComplianceWorker);

As a side note, it's customary to let variables and fields start with a lowercase letter, so I'd rename ComplianceWorker to complianceWorker. Note that this also improves syntax highlighting in StackOverflow: ;-)

ComplianceControlCenter ccc = new ComplianceControlCenter(..., complianceWorker);
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If you need the BackgroundWorker itself within the DoWork event simply upcast the sender. Maybe something like this:

private void ComplianceWorker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    var worker = sender as BackgroundWorker;
    if(worker == null)
    {
        //ToDo: What should happen if MS changes the behavior??
    }

    ComplianceControlCenter CCC = new ComplianceControlCenter(taskList.CheckedItems.OfType<string>().ToList(), file_box.Text, worker);
    CCC.start();
}
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Alternative suggestion: var worker = (BackgroundWorker)sender;. This will ensure that the program failes with an InvalidCastException if "MS changes the behavior". –  Heinzi Apr 3 '12 at 7:30
    
@Heinzi: Yes, you're right, but i just wanted to really point on this issue in the code example. –  Oliver Apr 3 '12 at 7:49

Why not just pass the reference of your BackgroundWorker as a parameter to your "work" method?

EDIT:

In fact you have to do that if you want to report progress or to check the CancellationPending flag if you can also want to cancel your operation manually.

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yes, that is what i am trying to do. –  Chris Rice Apr 3 '12 at 16:36

Solved it by doing this..

ComplianceControlCenter CCC = new ComplianceControlCenter(taskList.CheckedItems.OfType<string>().ToList(), file_box.Text,ref complianceWorker);

With this as the constructor.

public ComplianceControlCenter(List<string> task_list, String exe_location, ref BackgroundWorker complianceWorker)
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