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A function should select rows in a table based on the row name (column 2 in this case). It should be able to take either a single name or a list of names as arguments and handle them correctly.

This is what I have now, but ideally there wouldn't be this duplicated code and something like exceptions would be used intelligently to choose the right way to handle the input argument:

def select_rows(to_select):
    # For a list
    for row in range(0, table.numRows()):
        if _table.item(row, 1).text() in to_select:
            table.selectRow(row)
    # For a single integer
    for row in range(0, table.numRows()):
        if _table.item(row, 1).text() == to_select:
            table.selectRow(row)
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Actually I agree with Andrew Hare above, just pass a list with a single element.

But if you really must accept a non-list, how about just turning it into a list in that case?

def select_rows(to_select):
    if type(to_select) is not list: to_select = [ to_select ]

    for row in range(0, table.numRows()):
        if _table.item(row, 1).text() in to_select:
            table.selectRow(row)

The performance penalty for doing 'in' on a single-item list isn't likely to be high :-) But that does point out one other thing you might want to consider doing if your 'to_select' list may be long: consider casting it to a set so that lookups are more efficient.

def select_rows(to_select):
    if type(to_select) is list: to_select = set( to_select )
    elif type(to_select) is not set: to_select = set( [to_select] )

    for row in range(0, table.numRows()):
        if _table.item(row, 1).text() in to_select:
            table.selectRow(row)

-----N

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I would do just this:

def select_rows(to_select):
    # For a list
    for row in range(0, table.numRows()):
        if _table.item(row, 1).text() in to_select:
            table.selectRow(row)

and expect that the argument will always be a list - even if its just a list of one element.

Remember:

It is easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.

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1  
+1... much easier to maintain just one set of code to performs a task, and more pythonic; let it explode if someone calls it in defiance of the docs. If a function is truly needed that accepts a single integer as an argument, make a second one called 'def select_row(to_select)' and have it package 'to_select' as a list, then call select_rows. –  Jarret Hardie Jun 16 '09 at 0:12

You could redefine your function to take any number of arguments, like this:

def select_rows(*arguments):
    for row in range(0, table.numRows()):
        if _table.item(row, 1).text() in arguments:
            table.selectRow(row)

Then you can pass a single argument like this:

select_rows('abc')

multiple arguments like this:

select_rows('abc', 'def')

And if you already have a list:

items = ['abc', 'def']
select_rows(*items)
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+1 Like this approach better than Andrew Hare's... Problem could be if you needed to pass more arguments to the same function, not just the list/single argument. But you could either have those before, or use keyword arguments, i.e. **kwargs. –  Jaime Jun 16 '09 at 1:58

I'd go along with Sharkey's version, but use a bit more duck typing:

def select_rows(to_select):
    try:
        len(to_select)
    except TypeError:
        to_select = [to_select]

    for row in range(0, table.numRows()):
        if _table.item(row, 1).text() in to_select:
            table.selectRow(row)

This has the benefit of working with any object that supports the in operator. Also, the previous version, if given a tuple or some other sequence, would just wrap it in a list. The downside is that there is some performance penalty for using exception handling.

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This one is problematic for unicodes and strings. cf: stackoverflow.com/questions/305359/… –  Gregg Lind Jun 16 '09 at 21:50
    
Valid point, should at least have been "in (list, tuple)" ... or maybe "not in (string, unicode)". Preferably you'd want to look directly for "does this thingy support 'in'", I suppose. –  NickZoic Jun 17 '09 at 3:46

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