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For a JUnit test I need a String which consists of multiple lines. But all I get is a single lined String. I tried the following:

    String str = ";;;;;;\n" +
                 "Name, number, address;;;;;;\n" + 
                 "01.01.12-16.02.12;;;;;;\n" + 
                 ";;;;;;\n" + 
                 ";;;;;;";

I also tried \n\r instead of \n. System.getProperty("line.separator") doesn't work too. it produces a \n in String and no carriage return. So how can I solve that?

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1  
I am not a java guy but just to help you here I think the correct sequence for a carriage return is \r\n –  Farhan Ahmed Apr 3 '12 at 8:11
    
Where do you that it do not contain new line? In debugger or in output file? –  Michał Niklas Apr 3 '12 at 8:31
    
The question is not clear if we look at the accepted answer. –  Manu Apr 14 at 11:18
    
While asking the question I didn't know that the problem is not related to a carriage return problem. If I would have changed the title of the question, people would have complained that all the other answers don't make sense. –  Bevor Apr 15 at 10:51

6 Answers 6

It depends on what you mean by "multiple lines". Different operating systems use different line separators.

In Java, \r is always carriage return, and \n is line feed. On Unix, just \n is enough for a newline, whereas many programs on Windows require \r\n. You can get at the platform default newline use System.getProperty("line.separator") or use String.format("%n") as mentioned in other answers.

But really, you need to know whether you're trying to produce OS-specific newlines - for example, if this is text which is going to be transmitted as part of a specific protocol, then you should see what that protocol deems to be a newline. For example, RFC 2822 defines a line separator of \r\n and this should be used even if you're running on Unix. So it's all about context.

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The fastest way I know to generate a new-line character in Java is: String.format("%n")

Of course you can put whatever you want around the %n like:

String.format("line1%nline2")

Or even if you have a lot of lines:

String.format("%s%n%s%n%s%n%s", "line1", "line2", "line3", "line4")

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Hmmm, I still get a one liner. –  Bevor Apr 3 '12 at 8:25
    
Note that %n depends on the platform. –  Christophe Roussy Apr 10 at 15:45

Try \r\n where \r is carriage return. Also ensure that your output do not have new line, because debugger can show you special characters in form of \n, \r, \t etc.

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That doesn't work either. Now I've got a String which contains \r\n instead of new lines. –  Bevor Apr 3 '12 at 8:19
1  
Where do you that it do not contain new line? In debugger or in output file? –  Michał Niklas Apr 3 '12 at 8:25
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks for your answers. I missed that my data is stored in a List<String> which is passed to the tested method. The mistake was that I put the string into the first element of the ArrayList. That's why I thought the String consists of just one single line, because the debugger showed me only one entry.

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Do this: Step 1: Your String

String str = ";;;;;;\n" +
            "Name, number, address;;;;;;\n" + 
             "01.01.12-16.02.12;;;;;;\n" + 
             ";;;;;;\n" + 
             ";;;;;;";

Step 2: Just replace all "\n" with "%n" the result looks like this

String str = ";;;;;;%n" +
             "Name, number, address;;;;;;%n" + 
             "01.01.12-16.02.12;;;;;;%n" + 
            ";;;;;;%n" + 
            ";;;;;;";

Notice I've just put "%n" in place of "\n"

Step 3: Now simply call format()

str=String.format(str);

That's all you have to do.

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The line seperator is defined in the system properties

String newLine = System.getProperty("line.separator");
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