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I have this script which simply kills an app

KEY_NAME=/some/path
kill `ps -ef | grep $KEY_NAME | grep -v grep | awk '{ print $2 }'`
exit 0

If I write the kill command manualy as a oneliner than it works. But I have to run it as a script which doesn't work. So I tried to debug it and here is the result

[user@server logs]$ bash -x ./script.sh
+ KEY_NAME=/some/path
++ ps -ef
++ grep /some/path
++ grep -v grep
++ awk '{ print $2 }'
+ kill $'20557\r'
: arguments must be process or job IDs
+ exit 0

Why do I keep getting those strange characters on the kill line? How can i get rid of them?

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What happens if you add head -1 to that pipeline? –  alberge Apr 3 '12 at 9:00
1  
Have you tried killall? But if you're killing your own program, you might want to reconsider. –  l0b0 Apr 3 '12 at 9:00
    
@l0b0 I haven't and I probably won't. I don't want to end up with killing more processes than I should have... –  Tomas Apr 3 '12 at 9:11
    
@Tomas: Then you should really read the link. –  l0b0 Apr 3 '12 at 9:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Might be the case is number of pid's returned are more than 1 Change your line to

ps -ef | grep $KEY_NAME | grep -v grep | awk '{ print $2 }'|xargs kill
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This helped. Thank you... –  Tomas Apr 3 '12 at 9:11

The reason you get gibberish chars is probably (I can't verify it because I don't have access to your environment) due to the subshell returning more than one line.

Try this:

KEY_NAME=/some/path
for pid in $(ps -ef | grep $KEY_NAME | grep -v grep | awk '{ print $2 }')
  do
    kill $pid
  done
exit 0
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You could replace all that with a call to pkill. With the -f option, the full command line is used for matching (not just the process name) so you can still match against paths.

pkill -f $KEY_NAME

Apart from being simpler, it gives you easier control over what to kill, e.g. killing only processes owned by a specific user/group or only the oldest/newest.

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