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In WebKit, Firefox and Opera, you can set the various table elements to display: block to stop them displaying like tables:

This can be useful on smaller screens (e.g. iPhones) that don’t have room to display tables laid out traditionally.

IE 9, however, still lays out the table cells next to each other horizontally — it doesn’t seem to honour display: block on the table elements.

Is there any other code that will stop IE 9 (or earlier) from laying out tables as tables?

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1  
A similar question from long ago: stackoverflow.com/a/5091822/405015. It just won't work in IE7, if you were hoping to be able to support it. box-sizing: border-box will be helpful if you have to deal with padding. –  thirtydot Apr 3 '12 at 9:40
    
@thirtydot heh, yes I just found that. I did look first but was searching with IE9 and not just IE. You just got an +1 for your answer to the older question :-) –  andyb Apr 3 '12 at 9:43
    
@andyb: It's funny that you found more of my old relevant answers than I did :) –  thirtydot Apr 3 '12 at 9:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Adding float:left;clear:left; will make IE 9 behave a bit better, but the width of each element will not be correct. If you add width:100% to the mix, it seems to behave the same as in Chrome and Firefox.

table,
thead,
tfoot,
tbody,
tr,
th,
td {
    display:block;
    width:100%;
    -webkit-box-sizing: border-box;
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    float:left;
    clear:left;
}

Edit: This has been asked before How can I make "display: block" work on a <td> in IE? and partially covered on How can I get inline-block to render consistently when applied to table cells? which quite rightly mention that any padding will cause the width:100% to create a horizontal scrollbar. However, this can be avoided with box-sizing:border-box;, or by using a suitably lower width or containing element with a fixed width.

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1  
+1 - I hadn't thought of the width. You don't need the display: block though. The float takes care of that for you! –  My Head Hurts Apr 3 '12 at 9:30
1  
Also, where is your profile picture from? I recognise it off a game I used to play when I was little but I cannot remember the name of it. I'm sure it was attack of the something... –  My Head Hurts Apr 3 '12 at 9:33
2  
@MyHeadHurts Ah, but the width will cause scrollbar issues if padding is used. Also, profile pic from Day of the Tentacle :-) –  andyb Apr 3 '12 at 9:40
    
Oh the joys of accomodating Internet Explorer! Ahhh - yes, that was it. Thanks :) Now I am reminiscing about games like Monkey Island and Escape from the Planet of the Robot Monsters. I think any chance of a productive day has gone out of the window! –  My Head Hurts Apr 3 '12 at 9:46
3  
IE 8 and 9 support box-sizing though, so that should sort out any padding issues. –  Paul D. Waite Apr 3 '12 at 16:49

How about:

table,
thead,
tfoot,
tbody,
tr,
th,
td {
    float:left;
    clear: left;
}

It might have repercussions on your layout with it using floats

Working example: http://jsfiddle.net/bHzsC/1/

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