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My script below will use two external tables to fill two separate tables, but am not sure if I am using my cursor the correct way. If I am using it in a incorrect way please help me to correct the mistake.

// update It's for an oracle database (ORACLE SQL)

DECLARE
L_volg_no1 NUMBER;
L_volg_no2 NUMBER;

CURSOR c_gip IS

SELECT
    artikelnummer,
    ingangsdatum,
    grossiersprijs
FROM dc_RMSSID_GIP;

CURSOR c_gip_promo IS

SELECT
    artikelnummer,
    ingangsdatum
    promo_nummer,
    actie_grossiersprijs    
FROM dc_RMSSID_GIPPromo;

     BEGIN
FOR r_sid1 in c_gip
LOOP

SELECT daa_imp_rms_gip_seq.NEXTVAL INTO L_volg_no1 FROM DUAL;

INSERT 
INTO daa_imp_rms_grossiersprijs (
    volg_nr
    ,importtijdstip
    ,importstatus
    ,artikelnummer
    ,ingangsdatum
    ,grossiersprijs         
)
VALUES (
    L_volg_no1,
    SYSDATE,
    'N',
    r_sid1.artikelnummer,
    r_sid1.ingangsdatum,
    r_sid1.grossiersprijs
);

END LOOP;

FOR r_sid2 in c_gip_promo
LOOP

SELECT daa_imp_rms_prm_gip_seq.NEXTVAL INTO L_volg_no2 FROM DUAL;

INSERT 
INTO daa_imp_rms_prm_grossiersprijs (
    volg_nr
    ,importtijdstip
    ,importstatus
    ,artikelnummer
    ,ingangsdatum
    ,promo_nummer
    ,grossiersprijs 
)
VALUES (
    L_volg_no2,
    SYSDATE,
    'N',
    r_sid2.artikelnummer,
    r_sid2.ingangsdatum,
    r_sid2.promo_nummer,
    r_sid2.grossiersprijs
);

END LOOP;

COMMIT;
END;
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The syntax looks fairly good but trust your testing more than my eyes :)

But more importantly; why use cursors for this task? Two insert statements would do the same job and being set-based (rather than procedural) code is likely to perform better in most RDBMSes.

Begin
    INSERT 
    INTO daa_imp_rms_grossiersprijs (
        volg_nr
        ,importtijdstip
        ,importstatus
        ,artikelnummer
        ,ingangsdatum
        ,grossiersprijs         
    )
        select  (
            daa_imp_rms_gip_seq.NEXTVAL,
            SYSDATE,
            'N',
            artikelnummer,
            ingangsdatum,
            grossiersprijs
    FROM dc_RMSSID_GIP;

    INSERT 
    INTO daa_imp_rms_prm_grossiersprijs (
        volg_nr
        ,importtijdstip
        ,importstatus
        ,artikelnummer
        ,ingangsdatum
        ,promo_nummer
        ,grossiersprijs 
    )
    select 
            daa_imp_rms_prm_gip_seq.NEXTVAL, 
            SYSDATE,
            'N',
            artikelnummer,
            ingangsdatum
            promo_nummer,
            actie_grossiersprijs    
    FROM dc_RMSSID_GIPPromo;

    commit;
end;
share|improve this answer
    
+1, you beat me by 10 seconds. Using a cursor for this is not a good idea. –  a_horse_with_no_name Apr 3 '12 at 10:27
1  
+1 beat me by 4 minutes. This is the way to go, although the commit is still dubious and might be moved to a level above. –  Rob van Wijk Apr 3 '12 at 10:34
    
Agree about the commit. And there is no exception handling. But I was trying to replicate the functionality of the sample. –  Karl Apr 3 '12 at 10:36

I believe you don't use your cursor well.

Cursor usages in SQL-Server can be found here and here. You can read here about MySQL cursors. Cursor usages differ from RDBMS type to RDBMS type. Your technical question would be more specific if you would add the RDBMS you are using as a tag. Algorithm for cursor usage:

  • Declare your cursor and link it to a query
  • Open your cursor
  • Process the rows of your cursor by fectching its rows and handle them as you like
  • Close your cursor
  • Deallocate your cursor

Exact usages can be found from examples.

share|improve this answer
    
would it then be better to use two scripts instead of one? It's for oracle by the way –  Eve Apr 3 '12 at 10:23
    
Looking at the code, Eve is using Oracle, not SQL Server. I added the necessary tag. –  a_horse_with_no_name Apr 3 '12 at 10:23
    
I didn't use Oracle since 2008, my anser is valid for SQL Server and MySQL. About Oracle I'm not sure. –  Lajos Arpad Apr 3 '12 at 10:29

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