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I am using SQL Server 2008 and I have a situation where I have view that within my application code I always order by a date contained therein, so I was wondering about efficiency etc.

I came across this blog post SQL Server - Order a View that explains that it is possible to order a view so instead of:

CREATE VIEW v
AS
    SELECT a,b,d FROM t
GO
SELECT a,b,d FROM v ORDER BY d

I could do:

CREATE VIEW v
AS
    SELECT TOP(100) PERCENT a,b,d FROM t ORDER BY d
GO
SELECT a,b,d FROM v

and get the same result.

My question is, which of the above is the more efficient?

If I want it to be as fast as possible would I be better off with the second approach or does it make no difference and sql server will work it all out the same regardless?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

complementing Remus answer, if you have a view v like your that contains:

SELECT a,b,d FROM t

once you do

SELECT a,b,d FROM v ORDER BY d

you are actually doing

SELECT a,b,d FROM t ORDER BY d

because a regular (non-indexed) view exists only as s SQL statement on the DB, so once SQL sees select * from view, it replaces with the view definition before generating the execution plan that will be run

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1  
Thanks for this answer! You explain why it is not a good idea and that was really helpful to me –  kmp Apr 3 '12 at 10:41

This is a moot point:

The ORDER BY clause is not valid in views, inline functions, derived tables, and subqueries

The trick of using TOP(100) PERCENT is a bad practice. Trying to enforce order by adding ORDER BY to a view is really barking up the wrong tree. If you need ORDER BY, ask for it in the query. end of story.

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It is valid with a TOP clause, which is why I had the TOP(100) PERCENT bit (the whole sentence in the link you posted is: "The ORDER BY clause is not valid in views, inline functions, derived tables, and subqueries, unless either the TOP or OFFSET and FETCH clauses are also specified.") –  kmp Apr 3 '12 at 10:03
1  
Yes, the TOP clause makes it valid but if you keep reading the provided link you'll run across "The ORDER BY clause does not guarantee ordered results when these constructs are queried, unless ORDER BY is also specified in the query itself." Speaking from practical experience, I could get away with an ORDER BY in a view with SQL Server 2000, but when we upgraded to SQL Server 2008 I had to move the ORDER BY to the queries. –  pete Apr 3 '12 at 10:20
    
Thank you Remus for the answer. It would have been great if you could have explained why doing it would be a bad practice, which I see others have now - thank you though, I appreciate you taking the time. –  kmp Apr 3 '12 at 10:40

I would expect performance to be pretty similar from both of these - if anything, the select from the simpler version of the view might be slightly faster, since the two queries are essentially identical, but the more complex version of the query includes TOP N processing as well as sorting.

The surest way to find the answer is to try it and see.

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