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I have two tables:

Table "items":

| id | name       | description                              |
| 1  | Michael    | This is a random description blabalbla   | 
| 2  | Tom        | This is another descriptions blablabla   | 

Table "moreitems":

| id | name       | description                              |
| 1  | Michael    | This is a random description blabalbla   | 
| 2  | Mike       | This is another descriptions blablabla   | 
| 3  | Michael    | This is a random description blabalbla   | 
| 4  | Blain      | This is another descriptions blablabla   | 

Currently, I'm fetching items from the first table like this:

SELECT * FROM items WHERE name = 'Michael' AND CHAR_LENGTH(description) > 10 LIMIT 3

I would like to include the second table in the query if the limit (3) has not been reached. How can I do that - without php?

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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try:

SELECT * FROM
(SELECT 'items' table_name, i.* 
 FROM items i WHERE name = 'Michael' AND CHAR_LENGTH(description) > 10 
 UNION ALL 
 SELECT 'moreitems' table_name, m.* 
 FROM moreitems m WHERE name = 'Michael' AND CHAR_LENGTH(description) > 10 
 ORDER BY 1,2) v
LIMIT 3
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This works, however I have a question: Will this unify both tables for every single query? Even if there are enough rows in the first? I'm afraid that this could slow down the server if this is the case. –  Tomi Seus Apr 3 '12 at 10:54
    
It will unify matching results from both tables (as opposed to applying the selection criteria to the UNIONed rows from both tables, which will unify all rows from both tables before finding matching records). You could add a AND 3>(SELECT count(*) from items WHERE name = 'Michael' AND CHAR_LENGTH(description) > 10) condition to the second WHERE clause, although that would make the query access the items table twice; it would only really be worth it if moreitems was much larger than items. –  Mark Bannister Apr 3 '12 at 11:08
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