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Can someone provide an explanation of variable scope in JS as it applies to objects, functions and closures?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 35 down vote accepted

Global variables

Every variable in Javascript is a named attribute of an object. For example:-

var x = 1;

x is added to the global object. The global object is provided by the script context and may already have a set of attributes. For example in a browser the global object is window. An equivalent to the above line in a browser would be:-

window.x = 1;

Local variables

Now what if we change this to:-

function fn()
{
    var x = 1;
}

When fn is called a new object is created called the execution context also referred to as the scope (I use these terms interchangeably). x is added as an attribute to this scope object. Hence each call to fn will get its own instance of a scope object and therefore its own instance of the x attribute attached to that scope object.

Closure

Now lets take this further:-

function fnSequence()
{
    var x = 1;
    return function() { return x++; }
}

var fn1 = fnSequence();
var fn2 = fnSequence();

WScript.Echo(fn1())
WScript.Echo(fn2())
WScript.Echo(fn1())
WScript.Echo(fn2())
WScript.Echo(fn1())
WScript.Echo(fn1())
WScript.Echo(fn2())
WScript.Echo(fn2())

Note: Replace WScript.Echo with whatever writes to stdout in your context.

The sequence you should get is :-

1 1 2 2 3 4 3 4

So what has happened here? We have fnSequence which initialises a variable x to 1 and returns an anonymous function which will return the value of x and then increment it.

When this function is first executed a scope object is created and an attribute x is added to that scope object with the value of 1. Also created in the same execution object is an anonymous function. Each function object will have a scope attribute which points to the execution context in which it is created. This creates what is know as a scope chain which we will come to later. A reference to this function is returned by fnSequence and stored in fn1.

Note that fn1 is now pointing at the anonymous function and that the anonymous function has a scope attribute pointing at a scope object that still has an x attribute attached. This is known as closure where the contents of an execution context is still reachable after the function it was created for has completed execution.

Now this same sequence happens when assigning to fn2. fn2 will be pointing at a different anonymous function that was created in a different execution context that was create when fnSequence was called this second time.

Scope Chain

What happens when the function held by fn1 is executed the first time? A new execution context is created for the execution of the anonymous function. A return value is to be found from the identifier x. The function's scope object is inspected for an x attribute but none is found. This is where the scope chain comes in. Having failed to find x in the current execution context JavaScript takes the object held by the function's scope attribute and looks for x there. It finds it since the functions scope was created inside an execution of fnSequence, retrieves its value and increments it. Hence 1 is output and the x in this scope is incremented to 2.

Now when fn2 is executed it is ultimately attached to a different execution context whose x attribute is still 1. Hence executing fn2 also results in 1.

As you can see fn1 and fn2 each generate their own independent sequence of numbers.

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1  
good answer to a good question. –  Joel Anair Dec 5 '08 at 19:58
    
love this answer, +10 –  hasenj Jan 27 '09 at 7:05
    
A simple and straightforward answer to a complex and confusing question. Great stuff. –  gargantaun May 18 '10 at 10:21
    
This answer is really imprecise. var x = 1; and window.x = 1; are not equivalent. In the second case x is deleteable. In the first, it is not. Using the term "attribute" instead of "variable" or "property" is unhelpful, since "attribute" already has two meanings for JavaScript developers, neither of which is the one you're using. Also, your description of execution contexts is wrong: if you're going to use terms from the ECMAScript spec then you really need to use them accurately. [continued] –  Tim Down Jul 8 '10 at 14:56
1  
@Tim: I accept all of your criticisim. However I find that super-fine precision whilst able to clarify even the most nuanced of behaviours is only properly absorbable by the clever bods. The rest of us mere mortals look on in bewilderment. I've been burned many times for being ever so slightly "imprecise" but these days I no longer worry about it. A simple "mental model" that works 99% of the time and is easy to grasp is better than a complex "accurate and precise model" that is difficult to understand. This is why most engineers still use Newtonian physics over Quantum physics. –  AnthonyWJones Jul 8 '10 at 15:14

Douglas can!

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It's hard to beat Crockford: http://www.crockford.com/javascript/private.html

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Variables not declared with var are global in scope. Functions introduce a scope, but note that if blocks and other blocks do not introduce a scope.

I could also see much information about this by Googling Javascript scope. That's really what I would recommend. http://www.digital-web.com/articles/scope_in_javascript/

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Functions introduce a scope. You can declare functions inside other functions, thereby creating a nested scope. The inner scope can access the outer scope, but the outer can not access the inner scope.

Variables are bound to a scope, using the var keyword. All variables are implicitly bound to the top-level scope. So if you omit the var keyword, you are implicitly referring to a variable bound to the top level. In a browser, the top level is the window object. Note that window is it self a variable, so window == window.window

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