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I know in C++ that you can declare on variables inside the FOR, e.g:

for(int i=0; i<10; i++)

is there any way to declare another variables inside the for? this won't work for me:

for(int i=0, char Ch='J'; i<10; i++)
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you mean of another type? –  andrea.marangoni Apr 3 '12 at 11:59
    
Yes, edited.. meant another type, like a class I've made or something. –  Jjang Apr 3 '12 at 12:00
    
no you can t! only same type.. –  andrea.marangoni Apr 3 '12 at 12:02
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8 Answers 8

Simple solution would be to make a scope just outside the for:

{
    char Ch = 'j';

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
    }
}
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1  
I am intrigued as to why this was downvoted, since it is actually the right answer. –  Matt Apr 3 '12 at 12:07
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You could use a std::pair:

for (std::pair<int, char> p(0, 'j'); p.first < 10; p.first++)
{
}
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No you cannot. You can do it this way:

char Ch='J';
for(int i=0; i<10; i++)

The problem is that to declare a variable of a different type, you need a semicolon (;) to separate the two statements -- the comma (,) declares a variable of the same type. But the semicolon has a different meaning in the for header.

If you are concerned about the scope, you can enclose it in a block as well.

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The answer is no, you can declare only one type inside a foor loop. The type can be a struct, though, so there's a weird hack around the restriction:

int main()
{
    for (struct {int i; char c; } s = {0, 'A'};
         s.i < 26; ++s.i, ++s.c) {
            std::cout << s.c;  // prints the alphabet
         }
}

But that's something you shouldn't really do, just declare the variables you need before the loop :)

int main()
{
   {
    int i = 0;
    char c = 'A';

    for (; i < 10; ++i) { /* ...*/ }
   }
}

Note the extra set of parantheses - you can use them to restrict the scope of variables if the names would otherwise clash with variables from the surrounding scope.

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You can declare another variable but only of the same type, the following works:

  for(int i=0, Ch='J'; i<10; i++)

But Ch will now be an int.

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Yes and no. Between ; you can do anything can be done with ,, so the following is possible:

for(int i=0, j=10; i<5; ++i,--j) { ... }

but if you need variables with different types, this cannot be done being the ; required to separate the sub-declarations.

Note that even C++11 auto doesn't help:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    for(auto i=0, c = "abcd"; i<3; ++i,++c)
        cout << *c;
    cout << endl;
    return 0;
}

result in a compilation error:

inconsistent deduction for 'auto': 'int' and then 'const char*'
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You can use the ",".

for(int i=0,x=0; i<x; i++)
...

I would say that int i=0 is executed outside of the loop... the definition of i is executed before entering the loop.

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You can't re-declare the data type for the other variables, try this instead:

   for(int i = 0, j = 10; i < x; i++) {}
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