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I am designing a tool (in LEX & YACC) to check whether the entered sentence by the user is grammatically right or not. How to check a sentence whether it is meaning full or not. My tool recognizes the pattern of the sentence. Eg: For the pattern s+v+o "I am reading the book" is RIGHT sentence! But "I am drinking the book" matches with the pattern which is not meaning full! How to give the rules for semantic checking of a sentence in YACC?

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3 Answers 3

You are trying to parse natural langauge using formal parsing mechanisms.

This pretty much doesn't work, as natural langauges do not follow nice clean grammar rules. You need to learn about natural language parsing methods.

Once you get past raw parsing, then you need to have a huge database of knowledge about the world, things, properties of things, and how things interact. This where knowledge that "books are not drinkable" comes from, and is used to filter your parses. Of course, you can add a little bit of this knowledge to your YACC grammar, and it will then handle your example, but you need a ton to handle what people really say, or reasonably can't be allowed to say.

"Colorless green ideas slept furiously". "Mary had a little lamb, a little cheese, and a little drink".

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Thank you for your suggestions! It helped me to understand the things clearly! –  Deepi Natarajan Apr 8 '12 at 3:10

You cannot use Yacc even for the first part of your problem: the check whether a sentence is grammatical. Natural languages do not have unambiguous context-free grammars. So you're making a toy program which recognizes a limited variety of sentences. Fine let's get past that and think about how to make the toy manipulate this sort of meaning.

Simply make a database about verbs which indicates what kinds of "arguments" they take, like functions in a programming language: the database indicates what subjects perform that verb, to what kinds of objects, using what possible instruments, in what situation, etc.

E.g. "The dog wrote a chair with a leaf". We look up "write" in our little toy database, and see that "dog" is not on the list of possible subjects, that (although the verb is transitive) "chair" is not a possible direct object, and that "leaf" isn't a possible instrument.

So our program can reject the sentence and give one or more of those reasons.

This is not much different from rejecting, say, A + B when A is an integer and B is a string, or func(A, B, C) when func has only two arguments.

You're better off doing this in a language that handles symbolic representations easily. The task benefits from being able to do pattern matching on tree structures.

Lex and Yacc actually do not bring that much value to this kind of task. At least not the regular lex and Yacc that produce and interface with C code.

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Ambiguity is a problem for YACC but not for Earley or GLR parsers. –  Ira Baxter Apr 3 '12 at 15:21
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I'm afraid that statement betrays a possible misunderstanding. GLR is not a way to handle ambiguous grammars, but to handle unambiguous grammars for which LALR(1) (Yacc's algorithm) is not powerful enough. GLR cannot handle a language like English, which does not have a context-free LR grammar. LALR(1) is hamstrung by having only one token of lookahead, plus some restrictions to compress the parsing table, making it impossible to construct a working table for some grammars. Natural languages can't be parsed even if you have arbitrary lookahead and uncompressed LR tables; it doesn't help. –  Kaz Apr 3 '12 at 16:50
    
I think GLR stands up to this better than you might expect. (It actually came from the NLP community). Parsers for real computer languages actually face context-sensitive languages; we just choose to handle this by writing a context-free grammar and enforcing the context-sensitive part outside the raw parsing machinery. I don't see why English is any different... you can write (WLOG) some context-free grammar (worst case: "English = word*;") that collects it. The question is how much extra context-sensitivity is handled by raw NLP parsers, vs. the "outside the parser" checks. –  Ira Baxter Apr 3 '12 at 17:19
    
Thank you for your suggestions! It helped me to understand the things clearly! –  Deepi Natarajan Apr 8 '12 at 3:10

IRa Baxter Having a database of knowledge about the world,things, properties of things, and how things interact you can add a little bit of this knowledge to your YACC grammar, and it will then handle your example, but you need a ton to handle what people really say, or reasonably can't be allowed to say.

Could you be more clear as how the knowledge can be added to YACC grammar by giving an example

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