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I have a class (singleton) and it contains a static Dictionary

private static Dictionary<string, RepositoryServiceProvider> repositoryServices = null;

in the instance of this class I populate the dictionary (can occur from multiple threads). At first I had just

        RepositoryServiceProvider service = null; 
        repositoryServices.TryGetValue(this.Server.Name, out service);
        if (service == null) {
          service = new RepositoryServiceProvider(this.Server);
          repositoryServices.Add(this.Server.Name, service);  
        }

then I got some exceptions as Item already added so I changed it to:

        RepositoryServiceProvider service = null;    
        repositoryServices.TryGetValue(this.Server.Name, out service);
        if (service == null) {
          lock (padlock) {
            repositoryServices.TryGetValue(this.Server.Name, out service);
            if (service == null) {
              service = new RepositoryServiceProvider(this.Server);
              repositoryServices.Add(this.Server.Name, service);  
            }
          }
        }

and padlock is in the class:

private static readonly object padlock = new object();

is this thread safe? or its overcomplicated? or should I use ConcurentDictionary?

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4  
Your changed code isn't thread-safe either: the initial TryGetValue needs to be inside the lock section too. But you'd be better off using something like ConcurrentDictionary<K,V> instead, if possible, as suggested in Yahia's answer - it'll certainly be safer and less complicated, it might even be faster too. –  LukeH Apr 3 '12 at 13:13
    
possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/9868219/… –  daryal Apr 3 '12 at 13:14
    
@LukeH +1 for answer to my aproach thanks –  Zavael Apr 3 '12 at 14:21
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1 Answer

up vote 8 down vote accepted

IF you can use ConcurrentDictionary - it is in several situations faster than your approach because it implements most operations lock-free while being thread-safe.

EDIT - as per comments:

The term "most operations lock-free" is a bit too general...

Basically it means reduced contention ... thus in some cases more efficiency compared to a situation with one global lock, i.e. accessing a second bucket while the first bucket is locked works as if there was no lock from the POV of the accessing code... although that means a lock local to that bucket... in real-world applications it delivers much better performance than a global lock - esp. with multi-core.

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+1 for mentioning lock-free operations! –  dasblinkenlight Apr 3 '12 at 13:09
    
Do you have a reference for ConcurrentDictionary using lock-free operations? (I hope/think it doesn't). –  Henk Holterman Apr 3 '12 at 13:46
3  
Lock-free thread-safe collections are the programmers' equivalent of a perpetuum mobile. "Can't see the lock" does not mean lock-free. –  Hans Passant Apr 3 '12 at 13:47
    
As I wrote: most operations are lock-free due to how MS chose to implement them while still being thread-safe - see for example here. It is definitely NOT completely lock-free as that couldn't be thread-safe... it locks internally as needed but it is carefully designed as to lock only when really really needed... –  Yahia Apr 3 '12 at 13:56
2  
@Yahia: As far as I know there's nothing lock-free about CD<K,V>: most operations will need to lock, but it uses some kind of striping -- one lock per bucket, iirc -- to reduce contention. And, of course, some operations -- eg, resizing the internal array -- will still need to take out a global lock in order to keep everything safe. –  LukeH Apr 3 '12 at 14:48
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