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I'm writing a prog for myself. Moving forth I'm facing lots of codes that I can reuse in other progs I'll be writing later. (keep in mind I'm a newbie).

Here's what looks sane to me: Put the codes in different .hpp/.cpp couples, inside namespaces (in case of related-ness to other concepts. The subject of this question). Here's an example:

extra_types.hpp

#include <iostream>
#include <gtkmm.h>

namespace mathematical
{
    class plane {...};
    class cone {...};
    class hyperbola {...};
}

namespace UI
{
    class autogen_xml {...};
}
#include "extra_types.cpp"

Here's the challenge: Some of these codes require standard libraries. Things are still fine until I haven't included my code in such a form:

here, say utilities.cpp:

namespace core_side
{
    #include "slots.hpp"
}

namespace user_side
{
    #include "extra_types.hpp"
}

Which results in inclusion of headers, especially standard ones, INSIDE another namespace, which's been just for the sake of code arrangement, but as you well know it reults in a huge scale of challenges.

Questions:

  1. How can such a problem be overcome in case I don't wanna sit back from this style of code/file arrangement?
  2. In case this strategy is wrong from it's base, what is the right, standard, logical and practically used replacement that you would encourage me to use?

Thanks so much for your helps ;-)

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2 Answers

It is rarely, if ever, advisable to include headers into a namespace. What the symbols mean and how you use them shouldn't change based on how you include them.

It is not advisable to include cpp files into a header. I can only guess that you have duplicate symbol errors and are trying to get around it. You want to use include guards instead.

Put your shared code in their own namespace. Reference them as though they aren't part of each of your projects. Treat them like an external shared library.

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Thanks for the point but its not my problem. In fact I've already used include guards and so, these are the fundamental principles. What I need to know specifically is simply answers to my 2 questions, since hearing of a professional answer to them clarifies the solution for me, and perhaps any other newbie refering to this question later. Thank you Tom. –  Haix64 Apr 4 '12 at 3:26
    
Also, looking at header files like /usr/include/c++/4.6.3/bits/ios_base.h for example, justifies such a style. Then I think it should be rational if I get firm about applying it, and now my question is HOW? –  Haix64 Apr 4 '12 at 3:38
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Taking a look at system headers (/usr/include/) which is indeed written by gurus, I realized that this is the correct way of doing the above code:

extra_types.hpp

#include <iostream>
#include <gtkmm.h>

namespace user_side
{
    namespace mathematical
    {
        class plane {...};
        class cone {...};
        class hyperbola {...};
    }

    namespace UI
    {
        class autogen_xml {...};
    }
}
#include "extra_types.cpp"

This is the solution I found for nesting namespaces. In each source file which's contents are to be put into a nested namespace, the nesting must be pointed out in each file, no matter they're gonna be flat physically or not.

And utilities.hpp should look like this (though this is not the cleanest way to do it, but perhaps the most usable):

namespace user_side
{
}
#include "extra_types.hpp"

And this way everything works fine. I need you dear professional's comments or upvotes to know I'm right so as to click "accept" on this answer.

Thank you ;-)

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