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Is it possible to have a class with overloaded ostream operator << , (as following code) to print out the address of that instance?

   class MyCls {
      friend ostream& operator << (ostream& o, const MyCls& c) { return o << "MyClass\n";  }
      friend ostream& operator << (ostream& o, const MyCls *c) { return operator<<(o, *c); }
   };
   MyCls a, b;
   std::cout << a << b;

Expected output:

    (0x12345678) MyClass
    (0x23456789) MyClass

Any workaround?

[Edit]

Scenario

I skipped quite a lot details of MyCls to make the question seems simple. The class actually has vectors of pointers to other classes. Those classes also have ostream operators overloaded in similar fashion. So my primary aims is to show which objects is contained in which containers.

    class MyClsB {};
    class MyCls {std::vector<MyClsB *> containers; std::string attrA;};

    class Printer() {
    void operator() (const T& arg) { os << arg;}
    void operator() (T *arg) { os << *arg; }
    }

    int main(int c, char** a) {
      std::vector<MyCls *> v;
      //version 1
      for (int i = 0; i < v.size(); i++) std::cout << v[i] << "\n";
      //version 2
      for_each(v.begin(), v.end(); Printer(std::cout));
      return 0;
    }

Expected output

    (0x12345678) MyCls: attrA = v1
    (0x1234abcd) MyClsB
    (0x1234defg) MyClsB
    (0x23456789) MyCls: attrA = v2
    (0x2345abcd) MyClsB
    ...

Platform

  • Win 7x64: VS2010 express
  • Linux : gcc 4.4.5

[Edit 1]: I tried Benjamin's method, and it simply gives segmentation fault to me. Adding some debug print shows that Benjamin's method just go into infinite loop.

[Edit 2]: For Jerry's suggestion, my compiler complains "invalid static_cast from type ‘const MyCls*’ to type ‘void*’" (gcc 4.4.5)

[Edit 3]: Removing the pointer-version of operator<< just print the address but nothing more, which violated my primary goal. I think it's because not declaring pointer-version will use default implementation which just print the address only.

Why I declare pointer-version is to simplify the calling statement. Instead of

    std::cout << *p2Obj

just

    std::cout << p2Obj

Also, I have a functor object which is used to combine with for_each() calls my previous question

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1  
Just printing the pointer in the overloaded operator doesn't work? What's the question precisely? –  Karel Petranek Apr 3 '12 at 14:10
    
Do you still have this function? friend ostream& operator << (ostream& o, const MyCls *c) { return operator<<(o, *c); } -- Delete that. That's what's causing your infinite loop. You have the function that takes a reference calling the one that takes a pointer, which is calling the one that takes a reference... ad infinitum. If you just use the version I provided, the one that takes a reference, it will rely on the default behavior of printing a pointer, which is to just print the address that it holds. –  Benjamin Lindley Apr 5 '12 at 15:59
    
Also, you could get Jerry's version to work if you change static_cast<void *> to static_cast<const void*> –  Benjamin Lindley Apr 5 '12 at 16:07
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think I'd do the job just slightly differently than I've seen in the answers so far -- I'd explicitly cast the address to void * before printing:

std::ostream &operator<<(std::ostream &os, MyCls const &object) { 
    return os << "(" << static_cast<void const *>(&object) << ") MyClass\n";
}

I generally don't like casts, but in this case I think it's worthwhile to make it clear that your intent is to print out the address, so somebody doesn't mistake it for a bug/accident.

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std::ostream & os and static_cast<const void *> no? –  Benjamin Lindley Apr 5 '12 at 16:08
    
@BenjaminLindley: Yes, to both. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 5 '12 at 16:15
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Sure

ostream& operator << (ostream& o, const MyCls& c)
{
    return o << "(" << &c << ") MyClass\n";
}
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There's a lot of issues with your example code, but this is very easy to do and no need for friends:

#include <iostream>

class MyCls {
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, MyCls& instance) {
  return out << "MyCls" << &instance;
}

is sufficient.

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Why not simply:

class MyCls {
   friend ostream& operator << (ostream& o, const MyCls& c) 
                  { return o << "MyClass\n" << &c;  }
};

usage:

MyCls a, b;
std::cout << a << b;
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