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I have a database with two kinds of users. Something like:

User:
    name: String
    email: String

PowerUser
    address: String
    paypalAcct: String

where every user is a User, but people who signed up for extended services etc also have a PowerUser attached to their account. I wanted to separate User and PowerUser because I thought it would be nice to re-use the User table for people who have already become PowerUsers, because they should have all the normal stuff Users have.

Is this the right thing to do, or should i add the User fields into the PowerUser table and just work with that?

If it is the right thing to do, should User have a foreign key that points to a PowerUser, or should PowerUser have a foreign key that points to User? I would guess it depends on the order these things should be access? In this case I'd almost always be going from the User and checking if there is a relevant PowerUser, and not the other way round.

If I put the foreign key in Users, then a large number of users will have a null foreign key. If I put the foreign key in PowerUsers, then they'll all be filled, but going from Users to PowerUsers would require iterating over the entire PowerUsers table. Which is preferable?

-Haoyi

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The obvious answer is to add the foreign key to the dependent table. Users don't need PowerUser information.

If I put the foreign key in PowerUsers, then they'll all be filled, but going from Users to PowerUsers would require iterating over the entire PowerUsers table.

You don't need to iterate. You can get a list of all users with its power user information if they have one by using left outer join syntax:

select 
    a.id, a.email, a.name, a.email, b.address, b.paypalacct 
from 
    users a 
    left outer join powerusers b on a.id = b.id

If you only want to get a list of power users, then you use an inner join.

select
    a.id, a.email, a.name, a.email, b.address, b.paypalacct
from 
    users a 
    inner join powerusers b on a.id = b.id
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You're nearlly answering yourself:

If you use a single table, you'll have a lot of nulls. Nulls are not good, specially for indexing. So you'd better use a separate table.

As to he FK, if you add the FK in PowerUser, you'll have a not null column which can be the primary key in this second table. So finding the PowerUser entry for a user is really fast.

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An easily indexable surrogate key is preferrable (as it generally is with user account data):

User:
    id            INTEGER NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
    name          VARCHAR
    email         VARCHAR

PowerUser:
    id            INTEGER NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY REFERENCES(User.id)
    ...

Technically, you could also use the user name, but that would lead to a major hassle when changing an user name, and sooner or later this comes up in almost every user database. The PRIMARY KEY index makes lookups fast enough so there is no real performance penalty.

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