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There's a feature of the Apple Objective-C language which is really useful to me: I can pass code blocks as argument in methods.

I'd like to do that in Java, too. Something like:

myManager.doSomethingInTransaction(function() {
   dao.save();  
});

So the myManager object will execute my code between a startTransaction() and a endTransaction() methods.

Is there a way to get that in Java?

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The simple answer is "no", there's no functionality like that in Java. –  Aleks G Apr 3 '12 at 14:46
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3 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, Java doesn't support this. But you can get similar functionality with anonymous classes.

To do so, first you define an interface:

interface TransactionAction {
    public void perform();
}

doSomethingInTransaction should then be defined to take a TransactionAction as an argument.

Then, when you call it, do this:

myManager.doSomethingInTransaction(new TransactionAction() {
    public void perform() {
        dao.save();
    }
});
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1  
This example won't work as do is a keyword. –  Landei Apr 3 '12 at 14:50
    
Yeah, just noticed that. –  Taymon Apr 3 '12 at 14:53
    
Thank you. It cannot be clearer than this! :) –  Fabio B. Apr 3 '12 at 14:54
    
You get a bump, nice answer! –  lukecampbell Apr 3 '12 at 14:57
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No this does not exist in Java (yet). A workaround is to use the Runnable interface:

myManager.doSomethingInTransaction(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        dao.save();  
    }
});

or any interface with a single method will do.

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This is the best solution! –  Mr. Cobblepot Oct 2 '13 at 11:16
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you can use an Interface like

interface CodeBlock {
    void execute();
}

the function would look like

someType functionToBeExecuted(CodeBlock cb) {
    ...
}

it would be called like

functionToBeExecuted(new CodeBlock() {
   void execute() {
       // blah
   }
});

But if your code should be able to access variables or fields in will be more specialized. Also performance will be lower this way because of the new objects.

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