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I can't figure out how to word this correctly, but hopefully this code will suffice:

// a.php
function func_req($f) {
    // I know there are issues with paths, ignore.
    require_once $f;
}


// b.php
$myvar = "my variable!!!";
function myfunc() {
    // get myvar somehow
    return $myvar;
}

// client_code.php
require_once 'a.php';
func_req('b.php');
isset($myvar); // should return FALSE
myfunc(); // should return "my variable!!!"

Is there any way to modify any section of the code to get the desired results?


With client_code.php modified to the following:

  1 <?php
  2 require_once 'a.php';
  3 func_req('b.php');
  4 echo isset($myvar) ? 'TRUE' : 'FALSE'; // should return FALSE
  5 echo myfunc() ?: 'undefined'; // should return "my variable!!!"

and global declaration added to myfunc(), php client_code.php prints:

FALSEundefined
share|improve this question
    
Are these 'global' functions, or are they contained in respective classes? –  Grant Thomas Apr 3 '12 at 15:01
    
No. They are exactly as seen. I'm trying to get some semblance of file scope in PHP if you can't tell—but maybe that's impossible without the (mis)use of classes. –  user961528 Apr 3 '12 at 15:02
    
@yodaiken: The only way to produce file-level scope is with namespaces, or, as you say, a misuse of classes. Personally, I see no value in file-level scope, though. –  drrcknlsn Apr 3 '12 at 15:07

4 Answers 4

$myvar = "my variable!!!";
function myfunc() {
    global $myvar;
    // get myvar somehow
    return $myvar;
}

$myvar isn't within the scope of the myfunc() method, you could make it global (which is nasty), or pass it as a function parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
Nope. This doesn't appear to work. –  user961528 Apr 3 '12 at 15:00
    
You may want to make sure the func_req('b.php'); ran as expected. If the file wasn't included, then the myfunc() method wouldn't be available to you. –  Lee Davis Apr 3 '12 at 15:05
    
Please see my edited question. –  user961528 Apr 3 '12 at 15:10
    
The logic here is good. In @yodaiken situation, the problem is the scope of your variable. The problem comes from your func_req function. For instance, if you use require_once instead of calling it like that func_req('b.php');, it works. –  Maxime Apr 3 '12 at 15:11
    
Using require_once instead of func_req makes it impossible for echo isset($myvar) ? 'TRUE' : 'FALSE'; // should return FALSE to work correctly. –  user961528 Apr 3 '12 at 15:14

To make a variable available within a function then you would do something like :

$myvar = "my variable!!!";
function myfunc() {
    global $myvar; //allows the function to use the variable.
    //carry out any processing as necessary.
    return $myvar;
}

However globals should be avoided as much as possible. The proper way of course would be:

$myvar = "my variable!!!";
function myfunc(myvar) {
    //carry out any processing as necessary.
    return $myvar;
}

The reason globals are frowned upon is due to the ease of losing track of what makes changes to the variable. This in turn makes it difficult to maintain code.

share|improve this answer
    
Please see my updated question. –  user961528 Apr 3 '12 at 15:11

AFAIK there is no file scope in PHP.

You could either use Namespaces (which are realy, realy ugly in PHP in my opinion) or use Classes. Maybe a configuration object fits your needs?

share|improve this answer

You can't have variables private to functions. You could use a class:

<?php
class Test {
    static private $myvar = "my variable";

    static public function myfunc() {
        return self::$myvar;
    }
}

var_dump(isset(Test::$myvar));
var_dump(Test::myfunc());
?>

Live example

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