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I code in java but I think this question is not related to only one language.

My question occurs when we were talking with a colleague about List of object which is a field of a class. I was saying that I always initialize List with and empty list. So I can use the getter of this list directly without checking if it is null like this :

myObject.getList().add(o)

He says me he prefers to not create a getter to the list because he don't want to check if the list is null or not and so he creates a "addItemToMyList" method to add an item to the list. This way, he can control inside this method that the list is not null (and create it if this is the case) and there is no doubt about using the list this way.

I think that it can be a lot of work to write a lot of methods for each list we use (get the size, add, remove...).

Summary :


Case 1 : Always initialize field

Class :

class MyObject {
  private List<X> list = new ArrayList<X>();

  public List<X> getList() { return list; }
}

Usage :

MyObject myObj = new MyObject();
myObj.getList().add(anObject);

VS Case 2 : proxy list

Class :

class MyObject {
  private List<X> list;

  public void addItemToList(X item) { 
    if (list == null) list = new ArrayList<X>();
    list.add(item);
  }

  ... // methods to get the size, remove item...

}

Usage :

MyObject obj = new MyObject();
obj.addItemToList(anObject);

VS Case 3 : check null reference

Class :

class MyObject {
  private List<X> list;

  public List<X> getList() { return list; }
  public List<X> setList(List<X> list) { this.list = list; }
}

Usage :

MyObject myObj = new MyObject();
if (myObj.getList() == null) myObj.setList(new ArrayList<X>());
myObj.getList().add(anObject);

What's the good way for you with list and generally for complex fields ?

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2 Answers

I suppose this is subjective, but:

  • I would avoid case 3 for the reasons you mention.
  • I would probably use a mix of 1 & 2, without the lazy initialisation which makes your life more complicated and adds little (if anything) in terms of performance, and making the list final.

-

class MyObject {
  private final List<X> list = new ArrayList<>();

  public void addItemToList(X item) { 
    list.add(item);
  }

  ... // methods to get the size, remove item...

}

Now let's say that at a later stage you want to make that class thread safe and add a method which requires 2 operations to be made atomic, it is easy to add the relevant code without changing anything else:

class MyObject {
  private final List<X> list = new ArrayList<>();
  private final Object listLock = new Object();

  public void addItemToList(X item) {
    synchronized(listLock) {
        list.add(item);
    }
  }

  public void addItemToListIfEmpty(X item) { //let's say you need that method
    synchronized(listLock) { //you can make the operation atomic
        if (list.isEmpty()) {
            list.add(item);
        }
    }
  }
  ... // methods to get the size, remove item...

}

whereas in solution 1 you'd need to change all the code that uses that list.

And if the calling codes really need the whole list, you can always return a copy so they can play with it.

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If you want to guarantee that the list is always initialized, you should probably declare the variable to be final. (Actually, this is a good practice in general, to declare your variables final unless you need them not to be.) This will provide compile-time checks against reassigning the list reference elsewhere in the class (which could invalidate the guarantee that the list be non-null). –  Platinum Azure Apr 3 '12 at 15:53
    
@PlatinumAzure Agreed - amended. –  assylias Apr 3 '12 at 15:53
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In general, I'd prefer 1st approach -- just because list is the part of your code (your class, in this case), you can make sure that the list will be non-null always, thus saving from all the checks. Regarding 2nd and 3rd approaches -- such checks are needed across all accessors and will produce unneeded code duplication.

As a bonus, using 1st approach will allow you to specify list as final instance, making your class "more" thread-safe.

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