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Take this table WORDS

WORD
Hello
Aardvark
Potato
Dog
Cat

And this list:

('Hello', 'Goodbye', 'Greetings', 'Dog')

How do I return a list of words that AREN'T in the words table, but are in my list?

If I have a table that "contains all possible words", I can do:

SELECT * from ALL_WORDS_TABLE
where word in ('Hello', 'Goodbye', 'Greetings', 'Dog')
and word not in 
(SELECT word from WORDS
where word in ('Hello', 'Goodbye', 'Greetings', 'Dog')
);

However I do not have such a table. How else can this be done?

Also, constructing a new table is not an option because I do not have that level of access.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Instead of hard coding the list values into rows, use DBMS_DEBUG_VC2COLL to dynamically convert your delimited list into rows, then use the MINUS operator to eliminate rows in the second query that are not in the first query:

select column_value 
from table(sys.dbms_debug_vc2coll('Hello', 'Goodbye', 'Greetings', 'Dog'))
minus
select word
from words;
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Nice technique ) But what if access to sys.* functions is denied? –  denied Apr 3 '12 at 16:16
    
@denied Well that would be awkward indeed. There may be other ways to convert a delimited list of strings into a column that is more elegant than sys.dbms_debug_vc2coll. Perhaps there is a solution using pure SQL? –  Wolf Apr 3 '12 at 16:33
    
@Denied In this context, sys is not a bad thing. Someone could theoretically deny you access to that type, but it's probably not something you need to worry about. It's about as likely as someone removing access to sys.dbms_output. –  Jon Heller Apr 3 '12 at 23:20
    
Works perfectly and very clean. Thank you! –  Jeremy Apr 3 '12 at 23:52
    
Really neat way to get result that was not part of the table values. I used to do it using a UNION for each value and it was long. This is much better. –  Rohan Apr 4 '12 at 11:11

You can turn your list into a view like this:

select 'Hello' as word from dual
union all
select 'Goodbye' from dual
union all
select 'Greetings' from dual
union all
select 'Dog' from dual

Then you can select from that:

select * from
(
    select 'Hello' as word from dual
    union all
    select 'Goodbye' from dual
    union all
    select 'Greetings' from dual
    union all
    select 'Dog' from dual
)
where word not in (select word from words);

Possibly not as neat a solution as you might have hoped for...

You say you don't have sufficient privileges to create tables, so presumably you can't create types either - but if you can find a suitable type "lying around" in your database you can do this:

select * from table (table_of_varchar2_type('Hello','Goodbye','Greetings','Dog'))
where column_value not in (select word from words);

Here table_of_varchar2_type is imagined to be the name of a type that is defined like:

create type table_of_varchar2_type as table of varchar2(100);
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Try this solution :

SELECT
 a.word
FROM
(
 SELECT 'Hello' word FROM DUAL UNION
 SELECT 'Goodbye' word FROM DUAL UNION
 SELECT 'Greetings' word FROM DUAL UNION
 SELECT 'Dog' word FROM DUAL
) a
LEFT JOIN ALL_WORDS_TABLE t ON t.word = a.word
WHERE
 t.word IS NULL
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