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Wondering how to format the output of localtime() to year/month/day

I was able to do it easily using the 'date' command from terminal but I need to calculate previous dates as well, which I've figured out how to do in perl.

foreach my $i (0..7)
{
  my $date = localtime(time() - 60*60*24*$i);
  print "$i day(s) ago: $date\n";
}

Prints out this :

0 day(s) ago: Tue Apr  3 12:01:13 2012
1 day(s) ago: Mon Apr  2 12:01:13 2012
2 day(s) ago: Sun Apr  1 12:01:13 2012
3 day(s) ago: Sat Mar 31 12:01:13 2012
4 day(s) ago: Fri Mar 30 12:01:13 2012
5 day(s) ago: Thu Mar 29 12:01:13 2012
6 day(s) ago: Wed Mar 28 12:01:13 2012
7 day(s) ago: Tue Mar 27 12:01:13 2012
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Script:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;

foreach my $i (0..7)
{
  my ($d, $m, $y) = (localtime(time() - 60*60*24*$i))[3,4,5];
  printf "%d day(s) ago: %d/%d/%d\n", $i, $y+1900, $m+1, $d;
}

Output:

0 day(s) ago: 2012/4/3
1 day(s) ago: 2012/4/2
2 day(s) ago: 2012/4/1
3 day(s) ago: 2012/3/31
4 day(s) ago: 2012/3/30
5 day(s) ago: 2012/3/29
6 day(s) ago: 2012/3/28
7 day(s) ago: 2012/3/27
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Awesome, thanks. –  jackie Apr 3 '12 at 16:18
1  
Don't do this sort of date math on your own, as explained in perlfaq4. Just ask TomTom how much that matters. :) –  brian d foy Apr 3 '12 at 17:25

Here's an example of POSIX::strftime:

use POSIX ();

my @local = ( localtime )[0..5];
foreach my $i ( 0..7 ) {
  my $date = POSIX::strftime( '%a %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y', @local);
  print "$i day(s) ago: $date\n";
  $local[3]--;
}
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1  
That's a particularly clever way of doing that. :) Is the guaranteed to work everywhere? I couldn't find any documentation on what that should do. –  brian d foy Apr 3 '12 at 21:44
    
@briandfoy, I don't know if it's completely portable, but the odd values are handled by POSIX::mktime and POSIX::strftime from 5.8 to 5.14 on Windows (Strawberry and Active), UNIX and Linux -- and everywhere I've tried it. So, I don't know about a guarantee. –  Axeman Apr 4 '12 at 12:25

If you are doing date math, use a module that does it right. For instance, DateTime:

use DateTime;

my $date = DateTime->now;

foreach my $i ( 0 .. 10 ) {
    $date->subtract( days => 1 );
    say $date->ymd( '/' );
    }
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you could use POSIX::strftime from POSIX module.

perl -mPOSIX -e 'printf POSIX::strftime("%Y/%m/%d",localtime).

share|improve this answer
    
thanks! wasn't aware of that module –  jackie Apr 3 '12 at 16:29

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