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I am looking at the best possible approach to search and replace for a "group of strings" in an another String. The group of strings are constant [around 150 strings]. The text to search in is dynamic [around 10000 characters, nearly 2000 words)

Group 1 : {"foo","duck","man".....,"xyz") [ fixed set - O(150)]

Group 2 : "My name is foo. I have a duck" [dynamic text - O(2000)]

Input Text : My name is foo. I have a duck.

Expected Output Text : My name is *. I have a *.

The best approach i could think of is...

1) convert group 1 into a HashSet

2) convert the dynamic text into a String[]

3) Loop through the String[] and check if the string exists in the hashset.

for(int i = 0; i < String[].length; i++){
if(HashSet.contains(String[][i]))
 //Replace the string in the text
}

Any better alternatives?

Please share your thoughts...

UPDATED

This is the final code with the output to replace group of strings in an another String. (using regex)

public class StringReplacementTest
{

    private static final String[] restricted_words_list={"foo","duck","man","xyz"};
    private static final String[] not_restricted_words_list={"zoo","book","cool"};
    private static final Pattern restrictedReplacer;
    private static final Pattern nonRestrictedReplacer;
    private static Set<String> restrictedWords = null;
    private static List<String> nonRestrictedWords = null;


    static {//done once only

        StringBuilder strb= new StringBuilder();
        for(String str:restricted_words_list){
            strb.append("\\b").append(Pattern.quote(str)).append("\\b|");
            //using word break to avoid ***umptions;
        }
        strb.setLength(strb.length()-1);
        restrictedReplacer = Pattern.compile(strb.toString(),Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);

        strb = new StringBuilder();
        for(String str:not_restricted_words_list){
            strb.append("\\b").append(Pattern.quote(str)).append("\\b|");
        }
        strb.setLength(strb.length()-1);
        nonRestrictedReplacer = Pattern.compile(strb.toString(),Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);
    }


    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        String inputText = "My name is foo. I have a duck.. not ducks. I am FOO and the duckz at the zoo. i read book and COOL";
        System.out.println("inputText : " + inputText);
        String modifiedText = restrictedWordCheck(inputText);
        modifiedText =  nonRestrictWordCheck(modifiedText);
        System.out.println("Modified Text : " + modifiedText);
        System.out.println("List of restricted Words" + restrictedWords);
        System.out.println("List of non-restricted words" + nonRestrictedWords);
    }

    public static String restrictedWordCheck(String input){
        Matcher m = restrictedReplacer.matcher(input);
        StringBuffer strb = new StringBuffer(input.length());//ensuring capacity

        while(m.find()){
            if(restrictedWords==null)restrictedWords = new HashSet<String>();
            restrictedWords.add(m.group());  //m.group() returns what was matched
            m.appendReplacement(strb,""); //this writes out what came in between matching words
            for(int i=m.start();i<m.end();i++)
                strb.append("*");
        }
        m.appendTail(strb);
        return strb.toString();
    }

    public static String nonRestrictWordCheck(String input){

        Matcher m = nonRestrictedReplacer.matcher(input);
        while(m.find()){
            if(nonRestrictedWords==null)nonRestrictedWords = new ArrayList<String>();
            nonRestrictedWords.add(m.group());
        }
        return m.replaceAll("<b>$0</b>");  
    }
}

OUTPUT

inputText : My name is foo. I have a duck.. not ducks. I am FOO and the duckz at the zoo. i read book and COOL

Modified Text : My name is . I have a *.. not ducks. I am * and the duckz at the zoo. i read book and COOL

List of restricted Words[duck, foo, FOO]

List of non-restricted words[zoo, book, COOL]

Any advice to further optimize the implementation is welcome :)

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Is each word being replaced with the same string, or do they each have different replacements? –  Louis Wasserman Apr 3 '12 at 16:43
3  
Please provide a sample of input text, target match and expected output. –  anubhava Apr 3 '12 at 16:44
    
You'll have to create a Regular Expression using the strings of Group 1 then apply it to Replace(regularexpression, stringToReplacedFor). Its gonna be a huge chain but without loop its the only thing i can think about. –  Pedro Ferreira Apr 3 '12 at 16:46
1  
Why don't you want to "loop through"? Note that at some point under the hood a loop is unavoidable, whether you explicitly "code" it or not - even a regex would use a "loop" deep down –  Bohemian Apr 3 '12 at 16:49
    
@ Louis: Yes, they are replaced with the same string. –  Karthik Apr 3 '12 at 16:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

use a precompiled Pattern

private static final String[] arr={"foo","duck","man".....,"xyz"}
private static final Pattern replacer;
static {//done once only
    StringBuilder strb= new StringBuilder();
    for(String str:arr){
        strb.append("\\b").append(Pattern.quote(str)).append("\\b|");
        //using word break to avoid ***umptions;
    }
    strb.setLength(strb.length()-1);
    replacer = Pattern.compile(strb.toString());
}

public String replaceFoo(String in){
    return replacer.matcher(in).replaceAll("***");
}

you can get more complicated in what you want to replace it with

surrounding the word with <b> tags: replacer.matcher(in).replaceAll("<b>$0</b>"); ($0 refers to the whole match)

but if you want to say match the length of the matched string you'll have to loop it explicitly:

Matcher m = replacer.matcher(in);
StringBuilder strb = new StringBuilder(in.length());//ensuring capacity

while(m.find()){
    m.appendReplacement(strb,"");//this writes out what came in between matching words
    //m.group() returns what was matched
    for(int i=m.start();i<m.end();i++)
        strb.append("*");
}
m.appendTail(strb);
return strb.toString;

but if you want to be assured of optimal runtime you can build a trie and run the long string on that

share|improve this answer
    
@rachet : Thank you for the approach. could you please share your thoughts on the performance of the above approach if my "arr" has 150 strings. The text has 2000 strings. –  Karthik Apr 3 '12 at 17:03
    
Is it possible to replace the string with dynamic content with the similar aproach??? Input Text : My name is foo. I have a duck. Expected Output Text : My name is <b>foo<b>. I have a <b>duck<b> –  Karthik Apr 3 '12 at 17:13
    
@user1202552 sure check my edit –  ratchet freak Apr 3 '12 at 17:42
    
@ rachet: Thank you for the detailed code. This helps me to further analyze to the implementation –  Karthik Apr 3 '12 at 18:06
    
How can we extend the above approach for a case-insensitive match? –  Karthik Apr 3 '12 at 18:27

This would be my approach: Requires:

        using System.Text.RegularExpressions;


        string group2 = "My name is foo. I have a duck";
        String[] group1 = {"foo","duck","man","xyz"};

        //Build the pattern 
        string pattern = "( "+group1[0];
        for(int i = 1;i<group1.Length;i++)
        {
            pattern += "|" + group1[i];
        }
        pattern += ")";

        //Apply it
        Regex a = new Regex(pattern);
        group2 = a.Replace(group2, "what you want to leave behind instead of any of the words");
share|improve this answer

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